CTE study

This is a pretty crazy study. Obviously it's limited to people that actually donated their brains so probably only people that felt they had symptoms of some sort, but coming back with 99% positive is pretty crazy.

CTE Study

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heres a lil did you know this am for everyone that I learned at a concussion class I had to take to coach highschool football this year.... cheerleading has the 2nd highest concussion rating of any of any sports. of course football being # 1. that was crazy to me when I heard it.

the biggest thing I take away from the CTE stuff though is really back in the 80s and 90s the helmets worn were cement blocks and you were taught to use your head as a weapon back then. the helmets are much much safer now and now the technique taught is totally different. I think while there maybe a spike in concussions in the news and seen on game day its not because there is actually more concussions its because they take extra precautions and know what to look for in head injuries and make sure they do, back in the day you just grab some smelting salt and rubbed some dirt on it and when back in. football Is a violent sport. there are risks involved with playing. I don't want to see the sport turn into flag football. there are more deaths in nascar than the NFL you don't see nascar making everyone drive bumper cars around the track. for the integrity of the game I hope football continues to develop the helmets, train the proper way, and protect the players as much as possible while still protecting the game. if you sign up for football you know the risks. also the people that have donated their brains for study are NFL players. who made millions. (hundreds of thousands at least) in 2014 880 truckers died while on the job. high end truck drivers can make up to 70k a year. in everything in life there is some risk involved. I could talk about this all day.... as Ive had people ask me if I would encourage parents to have their kids play youth football on up and what I think about concussions. its one of those things where itll never happen to me and if it does you blame everyone around you for allowing it to happen. the only way to truly prevent it from happening because of football is by not playing but there are a lot of ways to get concussions still.

#Bapn ain't EZ

Wanna win put boobie in! Let boobie spin coach!

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I'll take Memes That Need to be Condensed for $500

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I'll take Memes That Need to be Condensed for $500

If you're reading the above post and thinking, "is this guy serious?!?," you can safely assume I'm not.

Started off well, but then...

Seriously though, you're comparing the NFL to NASCAR? The sport that has made far and away more changes in the name of safety than probably any other over the last 15 years?

Also, truck drivers? It's fairly common knowledge that trucking is the deadliest profession in the modern world, due to the dangers of driving in general and the hours they are expected to drive. Just the fact that you're comparing football to the deadliest profession is evidence enough that the NFL needs to take a serious look at themselves.

comparing a sport and a sport and a job and a job.

the sport aspect of it to me is its a game. don't dumb it down. yes there are risks involved. but you know this when you sign up. just like nascar. im not sure about other places but just here in Jacksonville we have a semi pro league of which guys provide their own insurance, make no money, purchase there own equipment or rent from the team they play for, practice 5 days a week and games on Saturdays because they love the GAME of football. they wont get a cent from anyone if they have concussion issues later in life. they play a sport because they love it they know the risks.

if you want to look at it from the job aspect of it yeah ill go with the most deadliest job in America.... mostly because if you look at the salary guys in the NFL are making id imagine most of us would walk out of our office right now and go play in the NFL for the money they are making knowing full well what the risks are.

#Bapn ain't EZ

Wanna win put boobie in! Let boobie spin coach!

I guess my point was that saying that the NFL is less dangerous than the most deadly sport and the most deadly profession in America is a lot like saying that cocaine is less deadly than heroin. Football is still a dangerous sport, even if players aren't dying on the field they are suffering debilitating injuries that are affecting them the rest of their lives. The NFL needs to do a lot more work in finding solutions to its problems, just like NASCAR has done over the last 15 years.

A few points:

1. You keep saying, "they know the risks". But, at this point, do we really know the full extent and probabilities of the potential risks? We are just getting an understanding of CTE. Most players are aware that their bodies can be left bruised, battered, and broken, but most think "That won't happen to me" and they definitely do not think about the long term effects on their brains. We are only relatively recently becoming aware of how CTE works and how prevalent it is.
2. I am over 40 and everyday my body reminds me of stupid things I did when I was younger. Back then, the thought of how I would feel physically at 40 never crossed my mind. This is true of most people in the age demographic of your typical college and NFL football players. Saying that they "know the risks" is expecting a level of foresight that is extremely rare in the people you are expecting to exhibit it.
3. I think the salary issue is drastically skewing your opinion. Just because they make a lot of money doesn't mean that risks to their long term health should be ignored, or hand-waved away saying, "you know the risks". The owners make a hell of a lot more money than the players, so should we be okay with disgruntled fans or fans of opposing teams assaulting owners? I mean, they know the risk that owning a team might piss some people off and they make a ton of money. What about CEOs? Since they make ridiculous amounts of money, should we allow Purge-style thinning of their kind. I mean, they would know the risks and make a lot of money. Should we institute an NFL payscale based on concussion probability of each position? Or would we be better served by working on mitigating the risks and making the NFL work environment safer? Hazard pay is a thing, but it does not allow employers to routinely ignore and even cover-up unsafe work conditions.
4. I wouldn't walk out of my office for a job that could potentially give me brain damage, severe depression, aggression and anger issues, etc, all before I hit 60. Why would I put my family through that hell just for a few years of making a few million dollars?

"Never half-ass two things. Whole-ass one thing."
-Ron Swanson

"11-0, bro"
-Hunter Carpenter (probably)

This is in-line with my thoughts on this subject. In summary, I don't think you can compare lifelong pain, severe depression, and brain damage to instantaneous (or near instantaneous) death in assessing a job's risks.

Can confirm, is rambling.

#thingsiblamethemvsfor

cheerleading has the 2nd highest concussion ratings of any sports

You lost me when you put these words in the same sentence.

Another white bronco? The first one didn't go too far.

If you think gymnastics is a sport but not competitive cheerleading my dude...

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

Gymnastics AND cheerleading are no more a sport than the pie-bake off at the county fair.

FACT!

Leonard. Duh.

My argument is: If you need a judge to determine the winner, it's not a sport.

I know this eliminates a lot of olympic "sports" but true sports don't require a 3rd party's opinion to know who won.

.....
95% of what I say is sarcastic. The other 5% is usually taken out of context.

So then chess and checkers are sports?

"We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior" Stephen M.R. Covey

“When life knocks you down plan to land on your back, because if you can look up, you can get up, if you fall flat on your face it can kill your spirit” David Wilson

What if we combine a couple criteria?

1. The result must not be based on a third party opinion (outside of forced adherence to the rules)
2. The "sport" must require EDIT: physical exertion

Therefore, Chess and checkers are not sports, they are competitive games...just like golf.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

2. The "sport" must require exertion

Define "exertion". Certainly chess requires significant mental exertion. Also what about gaming? It would also be a sport under your criteria.

"We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior" Stephen M.R. Covey

“When life knocks you down plan to land on your back, because if you can look up, you can get up, if you fall flat on your face it can kill your spirit” David Wilson

I meant physical exertion. Edited to reflect that. And no, I don't think professional gaming is a sport. It's a competitive hobby that certainly requires a particular set of skills. However, it would fall outside what I would consider sports. Of course, all those wii games would certainly tire you out so I guess my definition would need more clarification.

3. Must pass the hokie07ME eye test for whether it's a sport

boom, done.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

So would bowling be a sport? What about curling? I actually find this an interesting topic because I think defining sport is one of those things where you can't define it but you know it when you see it.

"We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior" Stephen M.R. Covey

“When life knocks you down plan to land on your back, because if you can look up, you can get up, if you fall flat on your face it can kill your spirit” David Wilson

Yes bowling and curling are, and should be, considered sports. They're lower in the sporting heirarchy, but they definitely belong on the list.

“You got one guy going boom, one guy going whack, and one guy not getting in the endzone.”
― John Madden (describing VT's offense?)

If we define it as an athletic competition people would pay money to watch, can we knock out half of UVA's championship claims?

Sometimes we live no particular way but our own

My argument is: If you need a judge to determine the winner, it's not a sport.

^^This!

Take the shortest route to the ball and arrive in bad humor.

Like when that idiot ref judged it was not a catch on replay so his team would "win" the Sugar Bowl?

Sometimes we live no particular way but our own

It also eliminates football, basketball, and baseball, due to the third-party opinions of the referees and umpires. I guess the biggest "true sports" in America are NASCAR and golf.

What do you think referees do?

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

if you sign up for football you know the risks.

I guarantee that youth league and high school kids (likely college and even pro players) don't know or understand the risks of CTE associated with playing football. They certainly didn't more than 5 years ago. While this information is becoming more visible, as someone noted above, the long term effects still aren't well understood.

I'll offer a scorching hot take- if these studies continue to show this kind of severity of damage to players at all levels, any parent who understands that risk and still signs their child up for youth contact football in its current form is willfully endangering their child.

Joffrey, Cersei, Ilyn Payne, the Hound, Jeff Jagodzinsku, Paul Johnson, Pat Narduzzi.

Wait continually getting smacked in the head by world class athletes gives you brain damage? Allow me to put on my shocked face

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

I don't doubt that football causes damage, but 99% positive makes me wonder about the study a little bit.

Needed to send in some "control" brains from people who had brain issues but hadn't played contact sports in order to better validate the results.

Of course 110 out of 111 from the NFL does make one think there might be a correlation...

Well obviously the guys who donated their brains thought something was wrong which is why they donated them.

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

I suppose you mean their families.

Also, there is a financial incentive.

This is an important topic, but there's room for more studies here.

I had similar concerns, 99% positive leads to some skepticism.

Obviously you'd expect trauma from playing football, but now I have to wonder if CTE is more common in all walks of life than originally thought.

I completely understand the selection bias at play here but I don't understand how that immediately leads to wondering "if CTE is more common in all walks of life"? Unless you mean contact sports and/or sports that include hits to the head (aka soccer though technically not a contact sport, you do have headers).

I just think there needs to be a better control. Maybe playing football only in high school is enough to lead to CTE. The reactions to the study make it seem like football = death, when maybe this brain trauma is just simply more common than we think, even among non-NFLers.

Shit I've had between 3-8 concussions from sports in middle and high school and later in life as a firefighter.

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

Join us in the Key Players Club

I had 3 concussions before 18 just from growing up as an active kid.

Understood. I agree with you there. I think we will find that we are much more susceptible to head trauma than we thought, and that the long-term effects are worse than we realized.

The set of players posthumously tested by Dr. McKee is far from a random sample of N.F.L. retirees. "There's a tremendous selection bias," she has cautioned, noting that many families have donated brains specifically because the former player showed symptoms of C.T.E.

But 110 positives remain significant scientific evidence of an N.F.L. player's risk of developing C.T.E., which can be diagnosed only after death. About 1,300 former players have died since the B.U. group began examining brains. So even if every one of the other 1,200 players had tested negative — which even the heartiest skeptics would agree could not possibly be the case — the minimum C.T.E. prevalence would be close to 9 percent, vastly higher than in the general population.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/07/25/sports/football/nfl-cte.h...

I swear to drunk, I'm not God

Slight tangent - any TKPers who've played football at any level concerned about getting CTE? Or perhaps want to share symptoms / experiences they might have already.

I can't remember if I've ever had a concussion

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I played through high school on the O-Line, lineman are actually ~30% more likely to suffer health problems due to concussions because they are more likely to get a bunch of little ones. I maybe had 1 while playing and am not too worried about it. If I had continued playing in college I would be more concerned about my long term health.

VT '17

Had three good concussions in H.S./College, 1 playing football, 1 playing soccer, and 1 skiing. Number of others 'that was probably a concussion' in hindsight. Wasn't a big deal when I was growing up, though there were some rumblings (mom was way up on it and wouldn't let me play football until I was in H.S.). Honestly I think my alcohol consumption and stress problems are way more of an issue than actual brain damage.

In my line of work I see a lot of people who have serious Traumatic Brain Injuries. Though there are some other causes, most of what I see is veterans. I can typically ID it within two minutes of talking to somebody. It's absolutely real and it's absolutely a problem.

I've been drinking.

3 confirmed (2 football and 1 lacrosse). I played LB and OL, so I am sure I probably had more that weren't as severe, or went undiagnosed. I find it hard to believe that the repeated "head banging" that goes on in the trenches didn't do any damage also. I did not play in college. That being said, I don't have issues with headaches, or any other physical ailments, that I can attribute to the concussions. Now my ankle that sounds like a bag of popcorn in the microwave with every step is a different story....

Mental issues? I honestly don't know. Does anyone really know that they are crazy? Hah. Short term memory loss? Only when I'm drinking! Anxiety? Sure, but I think it is pretty standard run of the mill worrying about work, family, life in general, etc. type stuff.

I can remember my coaches at every level teaching us to tackle/hit with our heads up. We would even be punished for not doing so in practice. This was in the late 90s/early 2000s, so the safe hitting and tackling techniques have been taught for a lot longer than people think. However, this didn't stop the coaches from whooping, hollering, and heaping praise on the kids that laid a big crushing hit or used themselves as a human missile to bust up the wedge on kick off coverage. Anyone with recent high school coaching experience know if they have outlawed the wedge play on kick off returns yet? I know it is illegal in the NFL and I believe its been outlawed in the college game as well. I can't think of a more dangerous play in football then the wedge and wedge busting on kick off coverage.

Where's the beef?

The most severe concussion I had was from being a wedge buster in practice, I remember blacking out and feeling funny for the rest of practice. Once practice was over, I started throwing up in the locker room. I should've self-diagnosed it when it happened but I suppose the tough it out mentality was still prevalent in 2010. I often wonder if I will have symptoms from it later on in life.

One for sure that I know of, but it wasn't football-related. I played on the OL though, and took lots of smaller hits that might be a problem.

I am seeing some minor weirdness going on already. Most noticeable is when I'm typing something out and a word I wasn't even thinking of shows up on the screen, like there was a disconnect between my brain and my fingers. Kinda scary.

I'm pretty sure that's called "aging".

And people wonder why participation in youth football is plummeting. The sport is just too damn dangerous, and far, far, far too many people who played it come away with life altering disabilities that severely hamper and ruin the remainder of their lives. I really do think you're going to see a sharp decline in the popularity of the sport over the next 20-30 years while the elite athletes turn to other sports, including soccer. (I say this fully knowing there have been findings that CTE does exist in former soccer players, but it isn't nearly as prevalent as was originally thought)

I honestly, wouldn't be shocked to find out that, by 2060, the NFL has dwindled to a niche league, at the same relevance that boxing is in the US public today.

Don't let this comment take away from the fact that Arkansas blew a 24 point 2nd half lead in the Belk Bowl.
Don't let the Belk Bowl take away from the fact that Matt Ryan blew a 25 point 2nd half lead in the Super Bowl.

I honestly, wouldn't be shocked to find out that, by 2060, the NFL has dwindled to a niche league, at the same relevance that boxing is in the US public today.

via GIPHY

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

Wow.

Who knew this study would kill football?

But I have to say, there's a very real risk of this unless they find some good ways to mitigate it.

Helmets are already a lot better than they used to be, but athletes on average are also bigger and better than they used to be.

I don't think this study is killing football. I think it's more the changing of public opinion. The USA has become more and more about safety and that has an impact on the game. As we are finding out more and more about the risks associated with football and other sports, I don't think you'll see parents letting kids into the game.

Hell, my folks would never let me play and I was 6 foot in 8th grade and would have loved to play. Fact of the matter is, with so few athletes making any meaningful gains from the sport in scholarship or career outlook, parents are going to default to safer sports like soccer and basketball.

I'm not saying they are non-contact sports, but the last time I saw a player spear another player using his head was Zidane.

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

One of the things that adds urgency and anxiety to my Tech fandom and need for a natty is the now conscious realization that there will probably be an 'end' to football, or at least an end to football being the YUGE deal it is today, and I don't want my school to be one of the ones that never won a natty.

Despite my affection for 'GET OFF MY LAWN', in the grand scheme of things I'm pretty young. I don't believe that as it relates to football there will ALWAYS be a next year. I think we will see the end of big time college football within my lifetime.

When I'm old and senile, I want to be able to youtube a tech national championship game without having to turn it off with 2:13 left in the 3rd quarter.

I've been drinking.

The more things change the more they will be the same. You have these massive stadiums all over the country that will need to be used down the line. Schools aren't just going to allow them to be abandoned within the next 20 years while football decreases in popularity. They'll find another use for them and the focus will transition elsewhere.

This is where I keep bringing up soccer, because its positioned well to take advantage of the decline of football. The cost of entry for a kid to play is virtually non-existent, contact is at a minimum, which will appease parents, and the sport is already taking root on a national sense at the millennial level, who will be the ones steering these kids to sports at a young age. And with MLS becoming a bigger and more serious league, they would be well positioned to start taking advantage of the college game, even if that means using schools as part of their MLS training academies.

Don't let this comment take away from the fact that Arkansas blew a 24 point 2nd half lead in the Belk Bowl.
Don't let the Belk Bowl take away from the fact that Matt Ryan blew a 25 point 2nd half lead in the Super Bowl.

Man I really hope the smart people at Tech working on preventing these brain injuries can step up with a solution. I can't spend my saturdays watching soccer knowing that football used to be in its place.

Agreed, I'd prefer watch golf than commi-kickball

I agree that something, maybe soccer, maybe a combination of soccer, lacrosse, and something else, will take football's place. I agree that the stadiums and infrastructure and everything else will demand that something go into that time slot, I just don't see me and Mrs. Lwyr getting up Saturday mornings at 9:30 (mtn time, actually, for me it's usually somewhere between 7 and 8 so I can catch at least the back end of some EPL and Bundesliga) in the f'all to start our elaborate ritual of watching 3 college games at a time in each timeslot while progressively blacking out on the couch through her designated drinks for each timeslot.

The ridicule that I take at home when it's not f'all and I'm watching lacrosse or MLS because I'm bored and desperate means that our household is one that will probably be lost when the ocho tries to replace CFB with soccer and/or lacrosse and/or whatever.

I've been drinking.

This is amazing news! Maybe we can all spend our crisp Fall Saturday afternoons watching the VT Quidditch Club Team take on LOLUVA in Lane Stadium! \s

Americans will never pay to watch soccer the way they pay to watch football; it just won't ever happen. Now if VT engineers invent a flying broom, then maybe Quidditch has a chance, although we'd still have to worry about CTE.

Personally, I don't think football is going anywhere anytime soon.

I'm all for safety, I'm all for research, it is all important stuff, but the fact is, people like money and people like quality entertainment.

--
"It's time to go play Virginia Tech Football longer and harder than anybody else in America!!" -- Justin Fuente
"I put a brick in Sacksburg today." -- Cam Phillips

Americans will never pay to watch soccer the way they pay to watch football; it just won't ever happen.

They already are. Go look at some of the ticket prices to these international champions cup matches. Nose bleed SRO were going for $100+.

I'm all for safety, I'm all for research, it is all important stuff, but the fact is, people like money and people like quality entertainment.

If people can't put player safety over their own desires and money then we have a bigger issue here.

I have no idea why my username is VT_Warthog.

Arkansas blew a 24-0 lead in the Belk Bowl.

If people can't put player safety over their own desires and money then we have a bigger issue here.

Yes, that was my point. It is an issue that has existed throughout the entire history of mankind. Money, wealth, power, are always an issue. That is just a fact. And to everyone's credit, a lot of money and effort is being put towards player safety and medical treatment. The brain is complicated, and there is a lot that we do not understand about it.

--
"It's time to go play Virginia Tech Football longer and harder than anybody else in America!!" -- Justin Fuente
"I put a brick in Sacksburg today." -- Cam Phillips

I'm all for soccer growing in popularity, I love the sport, I played it for 20+ years...but it's not in the clear with regards to concussions either. Granted they are going to come less frequent than they do it football, it still happens.

I still "remember" one game when I was 17 or 18, I slide tackled a dude and his knee caught me across the temple. I thought I popped right back up, but when I glanced around the ball and most players were down at the other end of the field, so I must have been down for a good few seconds. Didn't end up coming off the field either, this was long before all the concern and focus on brain injuries
Soccer concussions surging

Now finish up them taters; I'm gonna go fondle my sweaters.

I agree with what everything you've said. And that might be a first :D.

Back in the earliest days of football, players would literally die on the field (or shortly thereafter), until Teddy Roosevelt pushed for serious changes to the game. And the game evolved and got safer, and more popular.

They can do it again. Just gotta be more on the leading edge than the trailing edge.

No, I *don't* want to go to the SEC. Why do you ask?

We don't love dem Hoos.

Do we even know that CTE is purely related to head trauma? There seems to be an obvious correlation with CTE and the side effects that resulted in the request to study these individuals. I wonder though if there is anything similar going on upstairs with other high profile actors or musicians that are exhibiting similar behaviors. Could it be possible that the condition is more chemically induced than head trauma induced? I really want more data.

"with all due respect, and remember I’m sayin’ it with all due respect, that idea ain’t worth a velvet painting of a whale and a dolphin gettin’ it on" - Ricky Bobby

I've had the same thoughts, but rarely see this discussed. The only reference I have seen in the research and articles is that CTE causes drug addiction. Surely there are cases of CTE in non-drug users, but it is a very important piece of data that seems to be missing from the published research (at least to the extent that I've read). What percentage of football players that had CTE in the study, also used pain medication, alcohol, recreational drugs, or some combination of those on a long term basis either during or after their careers? I will say, I've read some papers that discuss CTE research dating as far back as the 1920's in boxers, then called "something, something, pugilistica". I'm not sure how common heavy drug use was back then and what type of drugs, compared to recent decades.

--
"It's time to go play Virginia Tech Football longer and harder than anybody else in America!!" -- Justin Fuente
"I put a brick in Sacksburg today." -- Cam Phillips

I wonder though if there is anything similar going on upstairs with other high profile actors or musicians that are exhibiting similar behaviors. Could it be possible that the condition is more chemically induced than head trauma induced?

It sounds like you're suggesting that it's possible that people get CTE as a result of social pressures, such as the pressures that come with fame/celebrity because there is some similarities in symptoms? I don't think this is a wise comparison - that's kind of like saying the Flu and food poisoning are the same illness because both cause you to vomit. Beyond that, it seems that CTE has a unique progression of symptoms that differs from those of (non-athlete) celebrities who commit suicide/make bad decisions.

According to this study, CTE starts with memory loss and social instability, and slowly becomes more physical, with Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease (what killed Jim Weaver) occurring in the second stage, and full-blown Parkinsons, speech challenges, depression and dymensia occurring in the third and forth stages. If a life of fame caused CTE, then we wouldn't see famous actors have 40+ year careers in the public eye that continue to 60/70 years old.

There is a clear, unmistakable relationship between CTE and head trauma, and that we can say with some confidence that head trauma is the primary (albeit, I admit, possibly not only) cause of CTE. I think it's unwise to ignore this or pretend/hope it doesn't exist. What we don't know is how much head trauma (both in terms of frequency and intensity) results in how much CTE, and if other factors other than head trauma (genetics, drug use, environmental factors, etc) can increase or decrease the speed at which it develops.

Twitter me

I was referring to potential links to alcohol/drug abuse.

I have no reason to think lightly of the possible problems associated with CTE. However, I do think the panic is premature. I question the quality of the data, which is why we need much more research on the topic. I also do not believe families should isolate young players from the sport solely based on the very limited scientific evidence we have.

Yahoo sports recently had an article written by a Doctor explaining why he lets his child play football. Here is a LINK

"with all due respect, and remember I’m sayin’ it with all due respect, that idea ain’t worth a velvet painting of a whale and a dolphin gettin’ it on" - Ricky Bobby

Roger Godell is going to pull a Trump and call this "fake news". Too many billions to be made.

He already threw a couple dollars at the problem with the concussion lawsuit. Nothing to see here. Everything's fine.

The Dude Abides

Doughty article about ex hokie: CLICK

I have mixed feelings after reading this, especially the comments.

"with all due respect, and remember I’m sayin’ it with all due respect, that idea ain’t worth a velvet painting of a whale and a dolphin gettin’ it on" - Ricky Bobby

Boston Globe had a piece about a new study that suggests that tackle football before the age of 12 can result in long term consequences, thought I'd share here.

It's a good read, and a freezing cold, logical, take.

"Parents have a really hard decision to make, and they can't say the science is there yet to make an easy decision based on just one study,'' said Robert Stern, one of the study's senior authors "At the same time, there is growing research on the effect of football on the brain, and we can't ignore it.''

Twitter me

I hope this pushes more football organizations to create flag football leagues through age 12. I think 2 years would be enough time to learn to effectively tackle before high school and flag football provides enough similarity to tackle football in that you still need to learn to throw, catch, run routes, be in position on offense and defense. Allow players to be more physical and block with their hands, rather than the body blocking most flag leagues require, and have them wear helmets for incidental contact. Would also save a bunch of money in youth leagues if the uniform was a jersey and shorts rather than a full set of pads and pants and jersey.

Come to Blacksburg and see what the Hokie Pokie is really all about

I missed this topic when current so thanks for the link. As many on this site who played and suffered many hits small and large and one who still bangs his head on things I have often wondered the effects of such hits. I was also prompted to look for possible ways to mitigate the effects. I found this: The Potential for DHA to Mitigate Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. and this: Curbing the Effects of Life-Long Traumatic Brain Injury. As well, one study posted on NIH site showed some promising results from THC. That might explain...nm.

In the meantime, eat your fish and take your Cod Liver Oil perhaps.

Play ball!

All I know is that seeing 5-7 year olds in the ED every day due to concussions from football is just sickening. These are little kids and already getting their brains rocked.

And now it is found that Aaron Hernandez had stage 3 CTE when he committed suicide. He only played in 44 NFL games, so the vast majority of this damage has to come in Pop Warner through college. It's basically showing that you're pretty much already screwed with brain damage by the time you make it to the NFL and anything you do there just further complicates the damages.

Don't let this comment take away from the fact that Arkansas blew a 24 point 2nd half lead in the Belk Bowl.
Don't let the Belk Bowl take away from the fact that Matt Ryan blew a 25 point 2nd half lead in the Super Bowl.

I would like to see more details on that and what his long term physical injuries were. Street gangs aren't exactly cozy places.

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

Join us in the Key Players Club

I would guess, with no evidence to back it up, that any time he took a significant blow to the head, his coaches from Pop Warner through HS and even college were of the mentality of "shake it off and get back out there."

We also have to remember that studies of brain trauma in football were really only starting to take off in the early 2000s, back when blows to and with the head were still considered a legitimate part of football and not the dangerous actions that we know them to be now.

No, I *don't* want to go to the SEC. Why do you ask?

We don't love dem Hoos.