OT: Engineering Opportunities in Lynchburg

My company, American Hofmann, is looking to expand it's engineering departments across the board. I'd love to get some more hokies in house so I'm putting this up here. My company is an OEM for balancing equipment. Anything that spins needs to be balanced to reduce vibration (think those little weights on your car's tires, only a lot more precise). We design and build the machines that determine a part's balance and either tell you how to fix unbalance or automatically correct said unbalance. Our smallest machines can balance the turbines inside dental drills. Our largest ones can handle 150+ ton steam turbines. We are a preferred supplier for a little aeronautical company you may have heard of: the US Air Force. On the floor currently we have a few crank shaft balancing machines for Ford that measure one crank while drilling on another to bring it into spec. In the pipeline, we have turbocharger balancers for Fiat Chrysler, armature balancers for Westinghouse, impeller balancers for ResMed cpap machines.
We write and maintain our own balancing software that runs on PCs, but all automation runs off of PLCs. I head up the mechanical engineering department so I can offer the most details on that, but I'll do my best to describe the others as well.

Mechanical Engineer - We are responsible for maintaining our core balancing mechanisms as well as designing peripheral automation (part handling, unbalance correction, etc). Anyone with automation experience would be a good fit. The balancing mechanism design requirea a lot of math that you would have done in dynamics/kinematics. Bonus if you know something about rotordynamics. We work in Pro/E for legacy designs and SolidEdge for new designs (in the middle of a transition to just SE). If you can use Inventor or SW, I can teach you to use SolidEdge.

Software Engineer - They write in C# and some old language (VB6?). Our balancing PCs just run windows so if you have experience writing programs to function in that environment I guess you'd be useful. I can forward you to someone who can speak intelligently to the needs there.

PLC Engineer - If you've worked with Allen Bradley or Siemens PLCs, that's a big plus. Just make the machine run the way the mechanical department expects it to run and everything will be fine. Or, alternatively, be able to speak intelligently enough to us MEs and tell us how you need the machine designed so we don't hit programming snags late in the build. I'm cool with either.

Electrical Engineer - Biggest job is component specifying for inside and outside the main cabinets. Their responsibility ends at the last thing with wires (motors, sensors, pneumatic valve manifolds), but needs to be able to work closely with mechanical to make sure that everything plays nice. I tell you what hp I need from a motor, you tell me what motor to order and make sure we have a cabinet big enough to house the drives. You tell me how you want things talking to each other (Profibus, Profinet, Ethernet, Skynet...) so I don't order the wrong components.

If you are interested in one of these shoot a cover letter, resume, and references to hokie07me (at) gmail.com and post a comment below so I know to check that account.

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Comments

Man I think I could shoot a spitball from my office to your office.

I have no idea why my username is VT_Warthog.

Arkansas blew a 24-0 lead in the Belk Bowl.

Parker? L&R?

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Nah not quite that close. VDOT off 501.

I have no idea why my username is VT_Warthog.

Arkansas blew a 24-0 lead in the Belk Bowl.

But would it be a balanced spitball? May go further if it was....

I digress. I'll forward on to some of my engineering friends. Nice post Hokie07ME!

If you are interested in one of these shoot a cover letter

Is this STILL a thing?? My understanding is that businesses have been moving away from it.

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

I know it's still prevalent in the engineer field and the legal field.

I have no idea why my username is VT_Warthog.

Arkansas blew a 24-0 lead in the Belk Bowl.

I'd recommended including one when an employer asks for it. Feel free to skip it if you don't want the job. Alternatively you could simply not even apply.

Joffrey, Cersei, Ilyn Payne, the Hound, Jeff Jagodzinski, Paul Johnson, Pat Narduzzi.

So on the flip side of the coin, if a potential employer does NOT request/mention it, don't bother with it?

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

I'd say it's up to your discretion and depends on protocol within the field, how you found the job, and how you want to portray yourself. Resumes are extremely monotonous to review and often candidates will start to blur together to the point of being indistinguishable. It is possible to make a resume more personable, and I'd absolutely recommend doing so if that's the only thing you're submitting, but cover letters are another way companies can try to distinguish candidates. On the other hand, if the company doesn't require a cover letter and you struggle writing them, you might be better off putting the effort into your resume to make yourself as appealing as possible. Resumes are usually expected to provide more quantitative information (degrees, GPA, metrics related to job performance) so if you have more of an advantage in those areas then play to those strengths. A cover letter does present some risk since you might say something that doesn't fit with what the company is looking for but overall if I'm looking at candidates I much prefer to get a sense of the person and their interests than skimming over resumes.

Joffrey, Cersei, Ilyn Payne, the Hound, Jeff Jagodzinski, Paul Johnson, Pat Narduzzi.

This. Resumes are great and all, but if you have the requisite skill set, you've only made the first cut. Cover letters can convey some of your personality and that's nice to know a little of before an interview.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

But what about the people who's personality sucks, but they are really really good looking? Didn't think about those people did you?! SMH!

Then you paper-clip a picture to your resume. Duh!

The Poster Formerly Known As The Spirit Of Bernard Basham

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

Every Hiring Manager is different. I rarely look at cover letters because of the pure volume of candidates I receive as a Recruiter. I often times use Cover Letters to screen people out of contention because of typos and grammatical errors, but sometimes I'll read one and it adds to the resume rather then repeating the same stuff I just read.

For example, If I was looking to hire a CPA for a Fortune 500 company and the cover says something like the following, it would be beneficial. It adds to the resume with why they are applying and directly relating their skills to the job description.

"Dear Hiring Manager: I have worked for the past 4 years with Global Audit Firm to establish myself as a strong candidate for a Fortune 500 Technology company like ABCD. I have experience working on large audit teams, strong technical accounting skills, and obtained my CPA during this time. I noticed that your organization uses Accounting Software 7.0 and I have had the opportunity to use that software since 2015 with several technology
clients. I appreciate you taking the time to view my cover letter and resume. Please contact me with any additional inquiries and I hope to hear from you soon!"

Again everyone is different, but as someone who looks at 200-500 resumes per day, I would suggest keeping cover letters on the shorter side, but it never hurts to add them.

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

This is very interesting. Thanks. Also, don't most HR Dept use software to sift through resumes and weed out the supposed unqualified candidates??

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

Yes, well at least for the companies I've worked for, your resume will come through our system with a "rating" our of 100. It is based on key words in the job description and your resume. The first lesson I tell anyone who will be working on my team is to ignore them. Someone could match 100% because they put a bunch of key words at the bottom of their resume. Others could match 75% because they are only putting skills or systems they feel strongly suited to use. I think if you are putting a resume together you should find a happy medium between including relevant information and stretching the truth. Good recruiters will dig deep into the skills necessary for the job.

For example, if someone says they are an Intermediate Spanish speaker and they only took four years of Spanish in high school, that's a turnoff. You need to be able to do more then ask Pedro where the library is or for more beer if that's going to be on your resume.

TLDR: Yes, but good recruiters don't pay attention to that, and we see any resume that comes through even if the system marks it as not a match.

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

Hey FudBoster, in an amazing twist of irony, I'm scouting a position where I need to compose a cover letter (legal field position). Any chance I can solicit your experience in wisdom so I can strengthen my position on attaining the position please??

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

For sure dude. Throw your best together along with a job description if you have it and shoot it my way. I'd be happy to give a thumbs up or an edit or two.

vthokierecruiter at yahoo dot com

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

Thanks Fud. Still at my current assignment (which concludes today), but I'll def kick it out to you this weekend. Mucho apprciando!

#FUENTEenFUEGO
Waho's suck
Uva swallows

Fud, what vertical do you recruit in?

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Now

I do a little bit of everything now... IT, Accounting/Finance, Sales/Marketing, and HR (Recruiters and Generalists mostly). I'm also a "Consultant" for a Government Contractor.

Started my career in IT Staffing and then did a few years in Accounting and Finance Staffing.

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

I'm a construction recruiter. Mechanical and General Contracting are my bread and butter.

What's
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That's a pretty interesting market to be in, mostly contract positions or perm/DH? I interviewed with an Architectural/Construction Staffing company based out of the UK a few years ago. I always wonder what could have been with the way the job market is now.

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

The market is real tight and it's only going to get worse. Contract work is insane with construction. It's like a never ending drama of issues with people not showing up to a job-site, cars breaking down, calling you at all hours of the night. I did it for 4 to 5 years and I moved over to perm.

On the flip side, perm placements are very different. There are a bunch of positions out there right now, like Superintendents, where people are retiring after 30 years, and there are no qualified people to replace them. Most schools produce construction professionals, but those students want to be in Project Management type roles. Big companies are trying to push young Assistant PMs into the field, and most will just make a switch if they don't like what's going on.

Most high schoolers aren't pushed into trade schools, which is causing the lack of supply in the field. So as more baby boomers retire, there is bigger demand for that position.

I literally got a Superintendent a 35k raise a few weeks ago. You typically don't see things like that, but that's where the market is right now. You have to blow people out of the water to make sure they will actually make the change.

What's
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That's cool, glad you made it to the perm side. Contract Recruiting can be brutal and I hated call/performance metrics. Definitely a candidate market these days, especially for govcon. My client has lost 4 Manager/Director level employees since the start of June... keeps me busy though.

I appreciate all the support, and I appreciate all the hate I am getting. I will continue to work as hard as I can to be the best I can be and bring this team a championship. Go Hokies 🐔 - Josh Jackson

If the cover letter shows a candidate did some research on the firm and really knows details about it, and highlights how they found this great opportunity that matches their experience and skills to the company's needs, that letter would be useful. Usually it is the same old form letter that shows lack of research and understanding. I am also involved in hiring so see a lot of junk.

#Let's Go - Hokies

As a professional recruiter, I can tell you that no one is actually reading your cover letter. Most people are skimming a resume for around 1 minute or less and coming back to cover letter (If you are lucky). You need to catch their attention in that one minute.

Recruiters are taught that if you are reading a resume for more then 1 minute you should have already called the person.

Instead of a cover letter, I would recommend bullet pointing out your experience in a summary. Make sure the person reading can understand what exactly you can do by just scanning the email.

I have successfully landed people interviews by just having a solid summary in bullet point form. They never even looked at the resume.

NO ONE READS PARAGRAPHS

Your resume should be at max 2 pages, and bullet pointed out. I will repeat DO NOT WRITE PARAGRAPHS.

Get rid of the objective, instead put a professional summary. Why? Because if that is the only thing that they read, they should have a an understanding of what you do and who you are.

Then put a mini chart of your certs and skillset (Software Experience, Licenses, Certs. Etc.) Why? Again people are scanning for specific things, putting them at the top after the professional statement pulls them in more.

Then you go into your experience. Make sure you put quantitative numbers in there. Mechanical Engineer, what size budgets were you working on? etc.

When you get in the door for an interview, the resume is just a guideline that they will look over to ask questions. It doesn't mean anything once you get in the door, it just helped you get there.

What's
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Thank you for putting this on TKP!
I am neither looking for an Engineering career or qualified for one, but I think it's great that you're actively reaching out to Hokies who are!

"When you're green, you're growing. When you're ripe, you rot." -Ray Kroc

Thanks. It'd be great to have a job board on here, but I wouldn't want to put more work on Joe. Until that's a reality, I'm glad we're free to post stuff like this.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

My new pet peeve: people who embellish their resumes. We are cool with hiring draftsman and designers, but don't bill yourself as a full fledged design engineer when you've got the skill set of a beginner draftsman. This guy put pneumatic design on his resume so I asked "do you have experience sizing actuators?"
candidate -"I've worked with people who've done that"
Me- "...ok...is a single rod cylinder stronger extending or retracting?"
Candidate- "It seems to me it would be the same either way. I could be wrong."
Me-"Oh you're definitely wrong"
Resume says he specified motors for conveyor applications.
Me- "What determines the size of a motor for a conveyor?"
Candidate- "My boss tells me which size to order."
Me- "so you don't actually specify them then."

TL;DR I know people think they need to tweak their resume to get in the door, but as someone doing the evaluating, if you don't at least measure up to your resume, you'll just piss me off and you won't even get a job you are qualified for.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

still doing interviews if anyone is interested.

And so this doesn't seem like a meaningless bump:

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Just got a resume from a LOLUVa grad. The last name is, no joke, "Caruthers" LOLOLOLOLOLOL

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

hire him now, just for the all the lols to be had

Ask me no questions, and I'll tell you no lies

Make sure he gets the special copy of the dress code. The one with the ascot required.

I'm a man! I'm 44! Hokie thru and thru.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

No no no. This is his dress code...

"How the ass pocket will be used, I do not know. Alls I know is, the ass pocket will be used."
- The BoD

hire him and sneak "fetching of merriment shoes" into the position's responsibilities

Chem PhD '16

Unfortunately, I don't know any Hokies looking for work in Lynchburg at the moment, but if you need someone to pinch hit as things are expanding, feel free to check out SPARK Product Development as a resource. We have a couple Hokies on staff and do work in Lynchburg from time to time. Good luck on the search!

Anyone in the Lynchburg area interested in getting together to talk some Hokie sports? Could schedule a meet up somewhere