Virginia Tech 23, Boston College 10

Analyzing the film of the Hokies' road win over the Eagles. Emergence of the Hokies' young wide receivers, Tech's run game woes, and a dominant LPD performance.

[Virginia Tech Athletics \ Dave Knachel]

Virginia Tech fans have good reason to be anxious when their Hokies travel up north to play the Eagles. Chestnut Hill has been a tough place for the Hokies over the years, and Tech's lost some games at Boston College they should've won. And while the Hokies secured their first ACC win of the season on Saturday, the Eagles kept the score closer than anyone in maroon and orange would've liked. The Hokies dominated for most of the game, particularly on defense. Bud Foster and company employed a high-pressure game plan and limited the Eagles to just 2 of 15 third down conversions. The offense lost Cam Phillips early in the game (ankle sprain), and with their star playmaker out, Tech only put 23 points on the scoreboard. The offense struggled with BC's defensive front, but Josh Jackson was able to pick up 322 yard in the air and lead his team to an important conference victory.

A Dominant Lunch Pail Defense

Boston College's offense has been dreadful this season (T-No. 121 scoring offense, No. 116 total offense), and most predicted that trend would continue once Foster's unit rolled into town. The Hokies' defensive line manhandled the Eagles all game long, especially on the ground. Ricky Walker and Tim Settle were simply too big and too quick on the interior for BC to block. Those two lived in BC's backfield, shooting gaps and tackling the ball carrier before he could get going.

On this 2nd-and-12, Boston College attempts an outside zone run to set up a manageable third down. The idea behind this outside zone play is both fullback and tailback read the block on the play-side defensive end. In this case, the DE is Houshun Gaines. If Gaines goes underneath the offensive tackle's block and heads inside, the fullback leads the way on the perimeter for the tailback to bounce the run outside. If Gaines gets outside the blocker, then the fullback leads the way for the tailback to cut back into the interior of the defense.

The Eagles never get to their initial read on Gaines because Settle blows the whole play up. Settle explodes off the ball, keeps his outside arm free, and gets in the tailback A.J. Dillon's (No. 2) path to the perimeter. This forces Dillon to cut up field to prevent a tackle for loss, but Walker's already cut off the cut-back lane. Similar to Settle on the front-side of the play, Walker is too fast and too strong to allow the left tackle to get across his body. This is a perfect example of how Settle and Walker have stymied inside and outside zone runs all year long, and the Eagles had no more success running on the interior than any of the other Hokies' opponents this season.

Without the benefit of a sustainable rushing attack, Scot Loeffler had to rely on the arm of his own redshirt freshman quarterback, Anthony Brown. Unfortunately for Loeffler and Brown, Foster's rush defense kept the Eagles in 3rd-and-long situations. That provided Foster the freedom to be creative and overwhelm the young quarterback with lots of different looks to process. The Hokies were able to generate substantial pressure on Brown, and Tech's corners added fuel to the fire by locking down the BC receivers.

The Eagles are in a fourth-and-short situation here, and Loeffler knows he is outmanned up front. Loeffler decides to run a rub route against man coverage. His hope is Reggie Floyd will lose his man in traffic, and that'll Brown an open receiver to hit for a conversion. Loeffler even rolls his quarterback out to give him a better angle and shorter distance to make the throw.

However, Foster sniffs out the play and calls for nickel-whip Mook Reynolds to blitz right into Brown's face. Mook's pressure prevents Brown from stepping into his throw properly, and the pass sails past the intended target.

In my mind, this is a quintessential Bud Foster play call. He knows his opponent's tendency — Loeffler loves this rub route to the slot receiver in short yardage situations. As such, Bud uses a blitz and tight coverage to force the offense to complete a low percentage throw. That's why teams are converting fewer than 25% of their third down conversions against Virginia Tech this season (No. 8, 24.74%, 24 conversions on 97 attempts). Foster is going to put offenses into uncomfortable situations and force them to execute against the odds. The teams that do execute, win. The teams that don't, and most of them don't, lose.

It should be noted that Reynolds played exceptionally well on the perimeter. I've written before about the importance of Reynolds' role in Foster's scheme, and when he plays like he did against BC things get very difficult for the offense very quickly. Mook was aggressive against jet sweeps, and his tenacity on the edge halted most of those plays that came to his wide-side of the field. He was especially effective against screens, which further limited Loeffler's options to stay ahead of the chains.

Virginia Tech's Young Receivers Shine

In the absence of Phillips, the Hokies had to rely on their young receivers to step up and make plays. As the game wore on, and it became clear the BC defensive front would make it very difficult to run the ball, receivers Sean Savoy, Eric Kumah, and Dalton Keene provided the spark that kept Tech's offense going. Jackson sprayed the ball around to his young receivers, and I thought he looked more in command of the offense than he has all year. He was purposeful in the short pass game, and delivered the ball to his receivers quickly as they were coming out of their breaks. Earlier in the season, Jackson had a tendency to wait for his receivers to pop open before releasing the pass. Against BC, Jackson instead led his receivers and got the ball to them early for yards after the catch opportunities. Jackson also impressed me with his decisiveness in the intermediate pass game. One of Jackson's throws that really caught my eye was Tech's first touchdown.

This clever RPO sprung Savoy open on a slant route behind a linebacker and in front of a deep safety. Initially, Virginia Tech threatens the defensive front with a split zone run. Ultimately though, Jackson pulls the ball from Travon McMillian and throws a bullet to Savoy. It's one of the most impressive throws of Jackson's young collegiate career. He hits Savoy on the slant perfectly in stride and leads him away from the deep safety.

The defender Jackson is reading on this play is the safety to the boundary, Will Harris (No. 8). This is a pass first RPO. Jackson is always going to throw the ball unless Harris floats into the middle of the field and takes away the passing lane to Savoy. If that happens, then the offense has a numbers advantage in the box and should hand the ball off. I've written before that Jackson could be a special quarterback in Justin Fuente's system, but only if he showed the confidence to deliver on these type of plays. Up until now, he has been hesitant to put the football in harm's way, rarely attempting to fit it into these type of windows. Now the time has come for him to take the next step. If Jackson is going to lead his team to an ACC title game, he must start trusting his eyes, arm, and young receivers working down the field.

Here's another example of Jackson decisively fitting the ball into a window down the field.

This third-and-long completion grabbed my attention because it was one of the rare times a Hokie quarterback completed an intermediate route in recent memory. Jerod Evans had success throwing go routes and back shoulder fades to Isaiah Ford and Bucky Hodges, but he wasn't tasked to throw many deep curls or deep in routes. This kept the pass structure simple for Evans and highlighted his strengths. Jackson, who doesn't have the rushing power or vision that Evans did, will need to connect on these type of routes. The offense is going to stall more this year without a consistent rushing threat, and there is no Ford or Hodges to kickstart a drive with a jump ball. The Hokies' receivers will need to get comfortable finding the windows in zone coverage, sitting in that space, and then working back towards the football to make a play. Paxton Lynch had success under Fuente with these routes, in no small part due to his NFL caliber arm. Jackson can make these throws if the offensive line gives him time, and he should trust himself to make these throws more often.

Eric Kumah was pressed into action after Phillips was sidelined, and he did not disappoint. He looked strong and poised for his first extended game action, I suspect we'll see more of him moving forward

If Jackson and his receivers can connect like this with any consistency during ACC play, then Hokie Nation will breathe a lot easier. The initial formation of the above 3rd-and-2 is a 2×2. Before the snap, Dalton Keene motions out of the slot which allows Jackson to diagnose the coverage. When Jackson sees the linebacker follow Keene across the field, he can confidently assume that he is getting press man coverage on Kumah to the top of the screen. Jackson gets the snap and looks off the deep safety, waiting a half beat before looking at the receiver he's already decided to target. Kumah impresses me with his body positioning on this slant route. He doesn't explode off of the line, but he is quick enough to get in between the cornerback and the ball. Kumah also does an excellent job at turning his shoulders to Jackson, providing his quarterback a bigger target to hit. Brad Cornelsen is going to need to find a way to beat press coverage this year, and he had to utilize quite a few tactics to defeat press coverage against Boston College. Seeing Kumah find success on slant routes against aggressive coverage gives me hope that he can be part of the answer at that position moving forward.

Running Game Woes

Despite the success Jackson had throwing the ball and the defense had shutting down Scot Loeffler's attack, the offensive line was unable to impose their will on Boston College. The o-line's struggles caused issues in the red zone, and Joey Slye was asked to kick three field goals, the longest being just 34 yards. Boston College helped themselves against the run by being physical up front, but a lot of the running game issues came from missed assignments.

This is one of my favorite play calls of the game, but poor execution led to it's failure. The Hokies have a numbers advantage to the boundary and call a speed option to double-down on their hand. Defensive end Wyatt Ray (No. 11) is left unblocked. Ray attacks inside and Jackson pitches to McMillian on the perimeter. The Eagles utilized man coverage to the boundary, so Kumah, the receiver split to the boundary, just has to run a go route and he clears the cornerback with him. The last thing needed to secure the edge for a long McMillian run is Yosh Nijman's block on linebacker Kevin Bletzer (No. 49), who ended up making the tackle. With Nijman letting Ray go, he should be working up to the second level immediately. Boston College is a well coached defensive team, and the Eagles know where the ball is going as soon as it's snapped. However, Nijman should still take a better angle to block Bletzer, who is scraping to the outside. This is a missed home run opportunity, the same as an overthrown ball or a dropped pass.

I don't mean to single out Nijman, there were plenty of missed assignments and poor run blocking fundamentals throughout the game. The Eagles were one of the worst ACC teams against the run heading into this game (T-No. 116, 234 rushing yards per game) and the Hokies allowed them look to like Clemson at times, particularly in the second half. This offense isn't going to start blowing opponents off the line of scrimmage, but they need to at least get to their assignments and engage their defenders. If they do, Fuente and Cornelsen have shown they can be creative enough with their playmakers to get chunk plays.

All in all, the Hokies went into an ACC opponent's house, won by double digits, and looked like the much better team. They suffocated the Eagles defensively and moved the ball through the air well enough to win, even with their star receiver hurt. Fuente now has a bye week to do some self scouting, get his team healed up, and (maybe most importantly) recruit. Jackson has an extra week to work with his young receivers some more, and I'm excited to see if they continue to improve upon this week's breakout performances. If Jackson continues to become more decisive in the pocket, the rest of the ACC Coastal should be concerned.

Comments

Mook was aggressive against jet sweeps, and his tenacity on the edge halted most of those plays that came to his wide-side of the field. He was especially effective against screens, which further limited Loeffler's options to stay ahead of the chains eliminated 90% of Loeffler's playbook.

Chem PhD '16

Beat me to it.

"Our job as coaches is to influence young people's lives for the better in terms of fundamental skills, work ethic, and doing the right thing. Every now and again, a player actually has that effect on the coaching staff." Justin Fuente on Sam Rogers

The Nijman missed block jumped out at me. That is atrocious technique. I am still very fuzzy on cut block rules. In my day, to run a weak side speed option as the OT, you would veer release to avoid the DE and climb to the linebacker. You want a very wide approach. Your aiming point is your inside shoulder (right shoulder) hitting the outside thigh pad (right leg) of the linebacker. If you can't cut the linebacker, you have to take an even wider angle and get your head across the linebacker or drive him to the sideline. Nijman was way way way too passive coming off the ball and took an angle to where the LB was, not where the ball would take him.

Five star get after it 100 percent Juice Key-Playing. MAN

Tim Settle was a beast. You gotta love the way he was regularly playing in BC's back field.

Extreme frustration with the right side of the O-line. They were not opening holes or watch Jackson get hit. Good guys, not doing the job.

Surprised you picked out the right side of the line, both sides struggled imo.

Agreed. Chung was getting thrown around, but Nijman also struggled with Allen. I had really high hopes for Nijman but he has cost himself some NFL money this year. Teller was good assignment wise, but the leg drive and dominance just hasn't been there. Even the McMillian TD run- Teller successfully blocks the BC defensive tackle. But, the defensive tackle eventually just tosses Teller to the ground. The block was serviceable (it was a TD, after all.) However, I am just not accustomed to seeing Teller, of all people, being neutralized or outmuscled.

Five star get after it 100 percent Juice Key-Playing. MAN

Dudes will get after ya.

I am just not accustomed to seeing Teller, of all people, being neutralized or outmuscled.

Injury? A bad leg or shoulder can take some of the fight out of you.

I have no idea. He just seems to lack energy.

Five star get after it 100 percent Juice Key-Playing. MAN

Someone tell him to skip the ketogenic crap during the season and eat some dang pasta, bread, and cake. And Taco Bell.

Someone tell him to skip the ketogenic crap during the season and eat some dang pasta, bread, and cake. pie, and Taco Bell.

Fixed that for you!

What's
Important
Now

I was frustrated to see Keene and MacMillan turn around and watch Jackson get hit by guys who had just run past them twice in the red zone, both times on the right side or the line. We would have scored if either had managed to put a hat on somebody either time.

Sometimes we live no particular way but our own

Thanks for posting, nice analysis.

awesome. Film review less than 48 hours after the game ended? Your TKPC dollars at work, ladies and gentlemen.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Just in time for monday morning at work too

Chem PhD '16

The only way this gif makes sense is if you're roll starting a manual vehicle

If a tree falls in Scott Stadium does it make a sound?

look at it again. The "motor" (and I use this term loosely) is spinning when the clutch is depressed, but the wheel is not. The pedal comes up, the clutch engages, and both spin together. This is what happens every time you start from a dead stop in a manual.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I don't know about you, but I hate having that much range of motion before the clutch engages.

"with all due respect, and remember I’m sayin’ it with all due respect, that idea ain’t worth a velvet painting of a whale and a dolphin gettin’ it on" - Ricky Bobby

Okay so first of all the clutch doesn't directly engage the wheel. So that part makes no sense. Given that, I assume your "wheel" is the flywheel and that your "engine" is the gear box. In that case the shaft from the gear box to the clutch plate is spinning whereas the shaft to the flywheel is not. Not depicted in the gif is the drive shaft, which would be connected to the other side of the gear box (left), and the engine, on the other side of the flywheel (right)

So if your flywheel is not spinning the engine cannot be running since the flywheel is directly bolted to the crank shaft. If your clutch plate is spinning its because the drive shaft is spinning while a gear is selected.

Therefore, the vehicle must be rolling with the engine not running prior to the clutch plate contacting the flywheel.

So as I said, this gif can only make sense if you are roll starting a manual.

If a tree falls in Scott Stadium does it make a sound?

if you're going to hold it to that high of a standard, then it doesn't even work for that... I mean, we haven't even talked about the shaft that just stretches out to engage the clutch. Shoddy engineering if you ask me.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

A fair point indeed. And I admit it's a stretch for that to make sense but it's still more realistic than the clutch driving the wheel directly. I never said it was a great depiction, but based on the info provided the only way it makes any sense would be to assume the wheel on the right is the flywheel and the box on the left is the gearbox

If a tree falls in Scott Stadium does it make a sound?

Guys all i did was go to giphy and search "clutch"

Chem PhD '16

New members probably need a warning that says something like this:

WARNING: All gifs will be critiqued and nitpicked by the engineers on these boards for technical feasibility.

"That move was slicker than a peeled onion in a bowl of snot." -Mike Burnop

Did anyone else see the interview with BCs Offensive Line coach where he talked about Settle and Walker?

Image result for manbearpig gif

"We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior" Stephen M.R. Covey

“When life knocks you down plan to land on your back, because if you can look up, you can get up, if you fall flat on your face it can kill your spirit” David Wilson

Image result for well this is awkward gif

I was just trying to make a MANBEARPIG joke. I don't think he really said it, but he should have.

"We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior" Stephen M.R. Covey

“When life knocks you down plan to land on your back, because if you can look up, you can get up, if you fall flat on your face it can kill your spirit” David Wilson

Where is this interview.if not give summary. Interesting since they just played Clemson

And while the Hokies secured their first ACC win of the season on Saturday, the Eagles kept the score closer than anyone in maroon and orange would've liked

Maybe score looked close, but this game was a blowout. Never felt any concern.

Agreed, but our lack of ability to run the ball and get into the end zone from the red zone is an issue for the future. We had quite a few offensive weapons out for this game (Peoples, Clark, Carroll, Phillips (most of it)), so I am hopeful that our offense can improve with them back in two weeks (praying for good healing vibes).

Pain is Temporary
Chicks Dig Scars
Glory is Forever
Let's Go Hokies!!

Tech positioned itself to blowout Boston College, but it was not a blowout. Had the Hokies stuck it in from the BC 16-, 11-, and 8-yard-lines, instead of settling for field goals, it would've approached a blowout. Stalling in the red zone is a bit concerning too. However, given the way the defense played, I also felt as if BC never had a realistic chance to win.

Don't forget the turnover on downs at the one-yard line at the beginning of the 4th......

Agreed that I never felt the outcome of the game was in doubt, but was frustrated at the lack of domination on the scoreboard.

Had the Hokies stuck it in

I gotta tell ya, Joe, these kids look awfully confused about trying to "stick it in". Coach tells them to do it, but the administration says that doesn't show Hokie Respect. It really seems to be tying up their brains. I just wish somebody would tell 'em it's okay to stick it in, even if it's just the tip, because that's all you need to get a touchdown. - JG

Agreed 100%. It wasn't pretty in the RZ and the D gave up a cheap TD, but the rest of the game was dominance by VT and the game was never in doubt.

Play in the RZ was very conservative, including what seemed like every play being a run up the gut once we move the ball inside the 10 yardline.

Question: Do you think the RZ calls were basically CornFu telling the OL "time to put on your big boy pants and knock someone off the ball, if you want the TD"?

the D gave up a cheap TD

I won't say it was in doubt, but that TD drive really pissed me off. Our server came to the table right after that to ask if everything was OK, and she could tell I was really upset. I pointed at the TV and said, "this is not OK." She looked at the score, looked at me, looked confused, and said, "but Tech is winning, right?" Somehow I could imagine a three-and-out followed by another drive like that, and all of a sudden it's a one score game. Fortunately, I was wrong.

Do you think the RZ calls were basically CornFu telling the OL "time to put on your big boy pants and knock someone off the ball, if you want the TD"?

I would like to think this is true.

"Our job as coaches is to influence young people's lives for the better in terms of fundamental skills, work ethic, and doing the right thing. Every now and again, a player actually has that effect on the coaching staff." Justin Fuente on Sam Rogers

Reminds me of that 19-0 game we played up there.

That was the last BC game I attended up there.

I felt the same way.

At one point in the 4th quarter I thought, "Has BC even gotten a first down yet?"

They hadnt, Techs defense held them to 6 yards with the addition of two false start penalties. SIX yards over almost the entire second half before they pulled their starters and they scored on a trick play.

Thats 6 yards over 5 drives...

Those final plays really skewed the stats. Doesn't look as dominating on the box score.

___

-What we do is, if we need that extra push, you know what we do? -Put it up to fully dipped? -Fully dipped. Exactly. It's dork magic.

Yeah I mean it wasn't a blowout, but we were never really in any serious danger of losing after we went up by 2 scores. Kinda just stuck it on cruise control and did the minimum amount needed to win, especially after Cam got hurt.

Don't let this comment take away from the fact that Arkansas blew a 24 point 2nd half lead in the Belk Bowl.
Don't let the Belk Bowl take away from the fact that Matt Ryan blew a 25 point 2nd half lead in the Super Bowl.

On the rub route where Mook hurried the qb into a bad throw, it looked like the receiver was open because Floyd(?) got picked off. When i used to play in the sandlot, we just switched receivers in that situation and each db took the receiver on his side of the play. Is there some reason our defense does not do that?

Doesn't matter if it's cake or pie as long as it's chocolate.

It's impossible to know without asking Foster himself what his coverage intentions are on that play. It's possible that Foster wants his backs to switch, but they had a miscommunication during the play. It's also possible that Foster wants to go straight man on that play and roll the dice on Brown not making the play.

Foster will switch up that coverage throughout the season. Keep in mind that switching responsibilities isnt without it's own risks. If Foster plays pure man, then the worst case scenario is BC picks up the first and the Floyd is in position to chase the receiver down before he picks up big yardage. However, if Facyson switches but the young Reggie Floyd doesn't, Loeffler can use that miscommunication to get his outside receiver running free up the middle of the field. In fact, that type of non-man coverage miscommunication sprung Sean Savoy for a big catch that very game.

Man, that play... if JJ throws the pass harder instead of floating it, Savoy walks into the house.

No, I *don't* want to go to the SEC. Why do you ask?

We don't love dem Hoos.

I love that Savoy decided to unleash his inner Cam Phillips this game.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

They do switch off in quarters coverage (that will be part of my film review- Mook knocked a ball away on slant/pick route early in the game to stop a drive.) In true man though, they stay with their own man. Man is better against fades, and quarters is better against pick plays. For a defensive coordinator, the key is to guess correctly. For the record, I thought Bud did a really good job of getting in quarters when Loeffler dialed up pick plays, especially on 3rd down.

Five star get after it 100 percent Juice Key-Playing. MAN

Kumah showed us a lot this Saturday. I still don't know how well he'd do as a deep threat -- Fuente and Cornelsen don't seem to use him on seam routes like they do with Cam and Savoy -- but he seems to play the role of "big strong possession WR" quite well out there. Reminded me a bit of Ernest Wilford and a LOT of DJ Coles.

Good execution on plays like the quick slant that Mason described and the long strong catch-and-run (sadly not pictured here) are exactly how a young WR forces his way into more looks.

No, I *don't* want to go to the SEC. Why do you ask?

We don't love dem Hoos.

I'm really hoping that broken tackle makes it into GIFtory this week

Here lies It's a Stroman Jersey I Swear, surpassed in life by no one because he intercepted it.

I think Wyatt had one of the worst missed blocks of the night on our fourth and goal. He pulls and completely runs by a defender and ends up in the endzone only to turn around and see his blown assignment result in Josh getting cut down before he can get anywhere. Coming from one of the best pulling guards in the conference that was really disappointing.

I think we are just going to have to wait until our next group of OL to start running the ball more effectively. This BC defense got absolutely ripped apart on the ground multiple times this season. I think Notre Dame almost put up 600 yards on the ground or something silly. Other than that, I was pretty pleased with this game. Against an opponent with a more threatening offense, I would have disliked the way we took our foot off the gas in the second half, but we knew we had the game in hand against BC.

While part of me agrees with you, part of me thinks - do you really think we'll get better talent than Yosh and Wyatt ? I think those 2 are talent wise, two of the best we've had in quite a while (and I know that's not saying much), and I don't see anything better coming in.

I have not been a fan of Coach Vice from the day he was added to the staff. Tech needed an experienced Power 5 O-line coach with some big boy recruiting credibility and a player development track record. The O-line recruiting is less than average and the current line just seems to have to many breakdowns.

Ugly beamer-like game against a crappy team but a win is a win. On to the bye...

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

I'm no George Whitfield, but I have a feeling that JJ's footwork on that RPO pass is very important to get him in position to make that throw in rhythm and on target.

The Broadcaster's Curse was unusually active/strong Saturday, too. Cam's injury after talking about him being a huge playmaker, JJ's pick after talking about how he takes care of the ball, PIs after complimenting pass coverage, it didn't seem to stop.

In our house, it's called "the curse of the graphic"

Since you brought up PIs, the one called on Stroman in the first quarter looked completely insane to me. There's more contact than that on practically every play.

Joffrey, Cersei, Ilyn Payne, the Hound, Jeff Jagodzinsku, Paul Johnson, Pat Narduzzi.

Oh I absolutely agree (and so did Ahmad Brooks, I think). It was just uncanny how awful it was. I was practically begging them to talk about ANYTHING but the game.

BC is always an ugly game, not just for VT, and we're at the end of a 5 week stretch. Wish it was a blow out and a shut out, but I will take a win and move on.

Something I just noticed the last couple of weeks... a lot of times when the RBs or Keene are sent in motion, then set before the snap, they keep chopping their feet.

Is that pretty normal, or is that just something that Fuente is teaching to those in his backfield? And what is the purpose? Maybe it's just me, but it doesn't really seem like you'd keep any momentum. Just can't figure it out, and now that I've seen it, I can't un-see it.

I noticed that the other week as well and was wondering the same thing.

My thought was to make it more uncertain if they are going to be blocking or running a route?

I've always assumed that if they stop running right at the snap, the ref could cause a false start if he isn't fully set, so they make sure it's obvious that they are still "in motion". Could be wrong though, but I've seen it for years by a number of teams, not just ours.

Skill players do not have to be set, but anyone with a hand down does. This is why teams moved from having WR put their hands down years ago.

Take the shortest route to the ball and arrive in bad humor.

Teams are only allowed to have one player in motion at the time of the snap, as long as that player isn't moving toward the line of scrimmage. This means that all other players, even skill players, have to be "set" before the snap regardless of which stance they take.

Set = can't be moving towards the LOS.

Spread teams seem to look like they are moving early A BUNCH.

Five star get after it 100 percent Juice Key-Playing. MAN

I hate that BC scored a TD late in the game, but I had to chuckle just a little bit at the play. Looks like Lefty figured out how to make the play work.