SEC officiating

Short article below about how when Joey Freshwater questioned officials after their loss to Auburn about a call it was explained to him but he wasn't able to disclose that information further which is interesting. I don't know if the ACC officials have this same policy or not but definitely adds to the times we feel refs are one-sided.

SEC Officiating

On Monday, Kiffin had a conversation with John McDaid, the head of officiating for the SEC. Kiffin said the conversation was revelatory, but league policy prevents him from divulging the details of the conversation.

"I really wish for our players, for our fans, that they could hear what I was just told," Kiffin said. "I think they deserve to. But I asked. They made sure to tell me there's a policy that I can't tell you, the players or the fans what their, if you want to call it, explanation for that situation and how TV copy and everybody in the country can see it hit him.

"I asked the side judge 'Why aren't they replaying it? Do I need to challenge?' He said 'They've already looked at it. There's nothing there.' I'm not allowed to say anything about the conversation, but I really wish that our fans and players could hear what I was told."

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Comments

Guess the policy was 'Auburn beats Ole Miss'.

The Orange and Maroon you see, that's fighting on to victory.

...and he was fined $25k for his social media after the game.

We put the K in Kwality

The SEC admitted that he was right, but it's against the rules to proclaim that accuracy in a public manner.

Hey, refs, maybe if you don't suck, he won't have to tweet about it.

"I asked the side judge 'Why aren't they replaying it? Do I need to challenge?' He said 'They've already looked at it. There's nothing there.'

Sounds like the explanation Fuente was given on the strip that was ruled a first down in the bowl game.

I think sometimes the coaches need to not rely on the ref's tell them in game at all times. Throw the challenge flag and make them look at it. They err like everyone else. "Somebody looked at it already" could be code for who knows what, or the guy Lane (or Fuente) was talking to might have been wrong, it wasn't being looked at in reality, and the coach was given wrong information.

However, if they leaked that's what happened, and it cost a big money team a game, it has big $$$ impacts due to bowl eligibility or standings that determine bowls. A ref blowing that could be in court explaining why he (or the conference that employs him) shouldn't be held accountable for consequential damages resulting from his error. Those mistakes can be the difference to a bowl organization of several million dollars as it impacts the teams available to pick from. The rule to keep it quiet or you get in trouble is, of course, nothing more than the NCAA and leagues covering their own rear at the expense of the member schools (and the schools are really the source of all the money in the end, they hold the big chips, they could really change this if they really wanted to as well).

I'd love to see a coach say "to heck with it" and reveal this stuff. Eat the fines, get them back and more in the settlements from the lawsuits later. I don't feel too bad for the coaches, however. They get paid big $$$ no matter what in the pool of guys and teams that could be dealing with big money fallout from officiating errors.

I am pretty sure you can't sue officials for bad calls. The SEC would have done it a national championship game already (or the ACC in NCAA championship game.)

they'd have to sue the conference that employs the officials to get to the real money. i'm sure some lawyer could make up a good sounding argument for conference accoutability for negligent acts of it's employees that resulted in some kind of economic harm to some party.

not saying they'd win such a suit, but it wouldn't surprise me given how litigation happy we've become. america - 5% of the world's population, 70% of the world's lawyers.

Most conferences pool bowl revenue, so it doesn't really matter which bowls each individual team goes to. Most conferences are going away from a hierarchy, so they all pretty much have the same access to all of the teams in a conference.

Where it can come into play is if a team misses out on bowl eligibility or gets knocked out of a NY6 spot.

it could affect and the revenue a bowl brings in though. if a bad call results in a bowl having to take a team with less draw, ratings for the game suck, and it makes less money, then that bad call could potentially result in consequential damages. personally, i think it's only a matter of time before somebody at least files a suit about it. we sue about everything else.

I don't think we'd see such a drastic event occurring, though.

Right now in the ACC, all of the bowls have equal access to all of the eligible teams. And most of the bowls are set up where a one game difference in the win/loss record won't affect their game's marketability. Like if the Music City Bowl decides they want to match up VT and Tennessee, they're not going to care if the teams are 8-4 or 7-5, because the regional draw is going to be more than the records.

The most likely situation for a bowl getting hosed would be one of the lower tier bowls wanting a team that they feel travels well regardless of their record such as VT, but having to take a 6-6 Duke or Pitt because the call went the wrong way. But even then, I don't think the difference is going to be that great that it can't just be written off as the cost of doing business.

league policy prevents him from divulging the details of the conversation.

This sounds sketchy

Twitter me

Wonder what the repercussions would be for Kiffin and his program if he just spilled the beans anyway. What are they going to do, make Ole Miss forfeit wins, ban them from the championship game? The SEC would come out looking bad no matter what kind of punishment they dole out.

The Orange and Maroon you see, that's fighting on to victory.

It is a good policy. Publicly criticising officiating in any sport just accumulates a mob that wants to take anger out on officials. Anybody that controls whether a specific official has a job or not knows the truth already. In all honesty, every sport would be much more watchable (especially basketball) if players and coaches weren't begging for a call on every single play. It is a job that contains human error. Coach and play through it. A bad call will cost you a game here and there and gift you a game here and there.

"A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it." - K

And that's the kind of mindset that has led to the quality of refereeing going down the absolute crapper across our professional leagues. When you're more worried about protecting the sacred image of authority rather than actually doing what is right, and then having a zero tolerance policy regarding criticism, it just leads to the rise of people like Angel Hernandez, Joe West, Ron Cherry, Karl Hess, etc.

You need transparent accountability to instill trust. Right now, there is no transparency at all across the ref circles at these higher levels, and as such, trust is at an all time low.

King Alum of the House Hokie, the First of His Name, Khal of the Turkey Legs, The rightful Heir to the Big Board, the Unbanned, Breaker of Trolls and Father of Gritty

I agree, Alum.

A press statement with a format, "Based on the views available to the replay officials, *what was seen*. According to the rulebook *referenced rules* these criteria were fulfilled/lacking/not determinable so the X ruling was made." would go a long way into helping fans, broadcasters, coaches, players, and other officials understand how the rules are applied.

I know there are officiating conferences and in-season notices sent out and whatnot, but that's no excuse to increase the "fog of (war) Football" or keeping us from knowing why someone is penalized in one game/Conference and not in another.

There will always be judgement calls, of course, and I don't think anyone thinks otherwise.

Click here to destroy wall.

Fans do not need to be involved in the accountability chain. The coaches are told, the people in charge are in the know. There is accountability. What we don't need is angry mobs of fans screaming about officiating. There are bad or missed calls in every game.

"A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it." - K

Fans pay the bills. Its a long term terminal mistake to think there needs to be no accountability or transparency between the leagues and the fans.

King Alum of the House Hokie, the First of His Name, Khal of the Turkey Legs, The rightful Heir to the Big Board, the Unbanned, Breaker of Trolls and Father of Gritty

Fans are the worst judge of officiating imaginable. Every message board of every losing team in history is full of fans that think the officials cost them the game. You want to add to that fire.

"A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it." - K

The bad look here is that Kiffen was right, the SEC admitted it, and still fined him.