Walk on WR Will Kakavitsas enters transfer portal

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Grad transfer AND three years left? Wow, COVID year unlimited eligibility unlocked

I am not sure what to do with my hands now

Crazy he graduated so early in BIT to have 3 years still left. If I recall BIT is no slouch of a business degree as far as the college of business goes.

Comp Sci dropouts basically

I been here since day 0.

I don't think that's really a fair characterization - any more than to say that a business major is an engineering dropout (which isn't true either for the record.)

Yeah but that stereotype isn't completely unfounded. I knew about half a dozen people who went the Engineering to BIT to Business route. At least in the early 2000s it was pretty common.

The dropout connotation is what bothers me the most about the comment above. It has a very negative connotation that makes those people who elect to pursue a different major as lesser students.

Lots of people change majors, especially out of engineering/CS, for a variety of reasons.

Yes it is an unfair characterization fueled by purely anecdotal evidence. Such as a good friend of mine's boyfriend started in CS and promptly dropped out due to the work load conflicting with his video game schedule. He transferred to BIT and then failed out so he went and got a degree in IT from ITT Tech...thankfully, my friend is a PT now so they aren't destitute. I feel like there are enough stories like this that people assume everyone follows this track, but it doesn't stand to reason that it's the majority or even the plurality of BIT majors' stories.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I'm just smarter than all the comp science people. Easier courses and I've still had a successful career as a dev.

In all seriousness they're very different majors and only one subset of BIT has the technical courses. In my completely bias opinion BIT is the best major at Tech. You rarely meet technical people that have business aptitude in my experience and that major gives you all the blocks to build that.

(add if applicable) /s

BIT is definitely the best major at Tech for someone considering either Pamplin or College of Engineering.

And I say that as an engineer.

In conjunction with your comment below. It definitely gave me a leg down in the actual CS stuff (especially in technical interviews) but I picked that up with experience. Its paying dividends now as I hit the "plateau" of dev money in my area and transition into a lead/management role - which I know isn't for everyone but that's been my career path goal since I started at VT.

(add if applicable) /s

out of curiosity does BIT have more hands on coding classes? Or do they teach the basics of like front end/back end programming? Because I could see that being very valuable for students entering the dev field. I also work as a dev, got an ME degree and did a bootcamp, have had a pretty good career so far. It's interesting whenever I've had to mentor interns/new grads from CS programs. They probably have a lot of theoretical knowledge, but need more help with hands on stuff like diving through existing code, knowledge about databases, setting up dev environments, structuring code, etc. unless they've had a few internships under their belt

Nope, not really, at least when I was there. I took intro to Java and I think 2 VB courses. The most dev experience i got was in the project management course project where i developed our appThe Java labs were the most hands on thing but hardly involving. The major itself really doesn't lead itself to being a dev at all I'm definitely an anomaly. Basically business with some tech courses then how tech is applied.

(add if applicable) /s

When I was there I remember the engineering majors at VT being very elitist. Very weird in retrospect. Engineering majors make slightly more straight out of college, but after being a few years removed from graduating, it seems like all of that is a wash in the end.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

It isn't just at VT. I work with a number of engineers who see their career as the epitome of human achievement and look down on everybody else.

Not all of them of course, but enough for it to be a meme around the office.

Thank you for recognizing how great us engineers are /s

That's true, and to this day its because its the only college at VT ranked in the top 20- outside of the Vet school. So yeah, Engineering majors look at it as the school within the school- always have. Having said that, ,Engineers that actually "engineer" are down to earth people compared to engineers that get vastly overpaid consulting gigs at beltway defense contractors in NOVA. Those folks can be insufferable.

Whoa show some love to our architect homies

-Stick it in

Don't forget about your construction lackeys down at Bishop-Favrao! You know, the people who actually have to bulid all the whimsical things you architects put on paper and all the dumb things engineers shit out.

When I was at Tech, there was data presented showing BIT had the highest percentage of students with jobs lined up on graduation and the 5th highest first year salary (behind four Eng disciplines). From personal experience as an engineer I have to imagine the ceiling for BIT is much higher than engineers (at least my field).

Engineers have a solid starting salary and then plateau unless they transition into the management/business side of things. Standard engineer is always comfortable but never rich.

Danny is always open

Truth. I know so many sales guys who started in engineering but wanted more money faster. Of course taking with old timers who worked with them in engineering, many were cases of "should never have been an engineer to begin with" so I guess everyone wins?

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I was always a little embarrassed about telling people that I was studying engineering because I felt that I was put on a pedestal unfairly just because of my major and I didn't like that. I knew plenty of folks who didn't do engineering and were just as, if not more, intelligent as me and most of my peers in my major but it seemed like whenever I was with a mixed group of folks and my major got brought up everyone automatically assumed I was the smartest person in the room (and very rarely was that the case, if ever)

Onward and upward

As a student who started in 1973 hen the PC itself really was just starting(and a "portable computer was basically a tower computer with a handle and 4 inch amber monitor and I missed IBM punchcards by just one year),mI had no idea what I wanted to do for a career (heck at almost 58 I STILL don't know what I wanna do when I grow up), So knowing engineering was-at the time at least- about the most difficult school to get in 9especially to transfer into) so I started with that. Did the first two years and decided it wasn't for me (but was nice to have completed the engineering calculus and physics classes).

So I transferred to business and using the same logic as above started out in accounting. After just over a quarter in that (yes we were still on the quarter system then lol), I quickly thought "boring" and decided to switch to another major in business. So I looked at which program I could complete with the LEAST additional classes which turned out to be management which degree I finished in fifth year(with a cake easy schedule for thev5th year).

Only 30-40% of college grads end up in a job in their major field (with that # largely being the technical/"skill" types - e.g. engineering, medicine, architects, etc.). For most of the rest, its a diploma that says you managed to survive 4 (or more) years of college and finished the requirements. My initial jobs out of college were restaurant work eventually managing them. Then after being laid off four years later, I ended up in the mortgage division of a then-regional/now 6thlargest bank in the country. My job was entry level but I was always someone who looked at others' work and said "hey how do you do that? Can I try?" and I have moved through most all aspects of the mortgage business with the same company and been there thirty years next March. My current position is in data management/analytics. While I never had the formal education in the data science type stuff of today nor the serious programming classes, I can write basic SQL queries and read and follow more complicated ones decently enough. My strengths are more pattern recognition and anomaly detection and knowing the actual business terms and logic that the variables represent. so I am a liaison between the IT folks (who know code but don't always understand the business logic and relationships among datapoints) and line-of-business folks (who know the business but lack the understanding of how computers "think" to the extent that some of them you had to tell them 'to click on the big blue E")

TL/DR: I guess my point is that the most important thing in college for MOST people is to 'learn how to learn" and to think critically and constructively". There will always be 'experts"/"savants" at particular subjects, but a person who has a BROADER education/knowledge of subjects (a Renaissance scholar in the terms of my parents' generation) who makes a far more valuable employee-and who at a good company can advance to high levels.
How many science/math folks do we know that can't write well enough to explain their concepts to layman(think upper management)? And how many English/social science majors can't do even the most basic math(like balancing a checkbook-showing my age there lol-or understanding basic econ -like supply/demand and opportunity cause.

If I'm an employer, give me someone who can think, and I'll teach them the details of my business and make them a star!

From the 2018 VT-uva game-"This is when LEGENDS are made!"

It's a different set of skills that includes both technical and financial understanding. Some career paths have a faster trajectory to management if you understand both

Hokie Club member since 2017

Oh definitely. I have just never seen a VT BIT major in the wild before. And I wasn't knocking the people who dropped out of VT Engineering. It just takes a different kind to get through the engineering program. It's one part dedication and one part masochism. I loved doing my computer and electrical engineering programs but, damn, was I glad when it was over.

The Key to making engineering at VT easy is not worrying about you grades. Once you realize that then it's just math, and we have computers to do that for us

Hence why I included this modifier:

as far as the college of business goes.

No one is comparing it to the engineering school.

congrats with douchiest comment of the year.

Dont hate us cause you aint us

I been here since day 0.

Lol. Double down.

Onward and upward

after reading all those comments that I thought would be about football.....

If you don't want to recruit clowns, don't run a clown show.

"I want to punch people from UVA right in the neck." - Colin Cowherd

Asking for a friend: What is the difference between BIT and Comp Sci? Obviously the former focuses on the business use cases of technology, but as one poster here says they've had a good career as a dev after a BIT degree, it sounds like there's a lot of overlap.

Aaaaand scrolling down just one comment, it appears I should drink.

Adding on, if you haven't seen the Steve Austin episode of Hot Ones, you really should.

If you're not sure if my comment warrants a "/s", it probably does.

BIT is just that.. and was created for the modern world where "IT" touches everything in a business. I like to call this major the NOVA consultant degree. Comp Sci is a different animal.. learning the "why" around software/hardware, etc.

In another world, I think I would've gone Comp Sci, bud. I've gotten pretty good at code hunting, not so much at writing it efficiently. Good thing I found a home centered around software implementations of an interesting physics problem, eh?

If you're not sure if my comment warrants a "/s", it probably does.

I would have done a shit ton differently... but ultimately wouldn't trade the experiences

Indeed, bud. Indeed.

If you're not sure if my comment warrants a "/s", it probably does.

As a CS person looking at the BIT degree completion plan at VT, the BIT degree basically looks like a business degree with some sprinklings of data science and basic programming mixed in.

In my experience, there's basically four types of code-related degrees you can get.
1) CS
2) Data Science
3) Something like CS but with less theory and math
4) Things like this BIT degree

Anyone here have any advice for jumping from business to Data Science? Is a degree a requirement or would work experience to the trick? I have my MBA but I am strongly considering going back one more time. I'm specifically looking at GTs (I know!) Online Master of Science in Analytics, Computational Data track.

Would getting that degree make it easier to break into the field rather than all the self-study I have been doing?

"The Big Ten is always using excuses to cancel games with us. First Wisconsin. Then Wisconsin. After that, Wisconsin. The subsequent cancellation with Wisconsin comes to mind too. Now Penn State. What's next? Wisconsin?" -HorseOnATreadmill

IME data science is an extremely hard job to do well without some education in statistics and machine learning. You can do it on your own, but it's hard. Most data scientists (and similar role) have some sort of graduate school experience.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

Data Science is a pretty broad field so it kinda depends on the specific job, but at the very least you'd want to be comfortable in a programming language like Python/R/SAS and be knowledgeable in statistics and linear algebra concepts. Some DS applies machine learning, and for that type of thing you'd likely need a graduate degree.

The good news is that I know GT has a great online graduate CS program, so I'd expect their program you are looking at is also really good. UVA also has a graduate Data Science program with online options that started about 7ish years ago. I think it'd make it easier to break into the field.

I taught myself Python and I am comfortable(ish) with it. I am no programmer and I'm sure experts in the language would rake my code through the coals, but I use it for work where I find the excuse.

It's the math that I know I am deficient in. I am in the proverbial danger zone where I know the code and I know how to clean and model the data, but I don't have a good grasp on the mathematical *why* behind it all.

These comments have been extremely helpful and I very much appreciate the input (and I feel better about that GT program!)

"The Big Ten is always using excuses to cancel games with us. First Wisconsin. Then Wisconsin. After that, Wisconsin. The subsequent cancellation with Wisconsin comes to mind too. Now Penn State. What's next? Wisconsin?" -HorseOnATreadmill

I can speak to this from someone currently finishing the process. I earned my MBA in May and decided to tack on an MS in Business Analytics which I will be officially done with in the next 48 hours. Two things jump out at me from the interviews and job offers I am receiving: companies would prefer to not have to sponsor foreign students & there is a need for people with a technical understanding (the ms degree) but can interpret the findings in an actionable way(your MBA). I was invited to an analytics pow wow last week with some leaders within the space from around the DFW metroplex and it seems like they are really struggling to find people who can do the interpretation. I know JP Morgan is approaching analytics as two separate jobs as I was pushed by them from the more technical role during interviews to the interpretation role.

There is also an opportunity in the surrounding space that can arise from any business analytics or intelligence degree. Process automation is one that I am also receiving interest in as it pairs well with understanding data and how it interacts with the various user personas that a company may have.

As for the GT program, my machine learning class was taught by someone who went through GT's machine learning certificate program a few years ago and tried to convince me to do the same outside of class. His understanding of theory was the strongest I saw within my school. So I have no doubt that the level of education would be exceptional. It was also the toughest class that I took and there were times when I felt like it was more of a doctoral class crammed into a summer session so be prepared for the possibility of an intense workload built upon theory, but if you are considering Georgia Tech, you are probably already aware of that.

Hope that helps. If you would like to speak more about it offline, I'd be more than happy to.

Ring Design Chair

Thank you for your insight, I had not considered how the MBA and the MS could complement each other! I was already pretty sure that I was going to initiate the program but this may have solidified it.

I came across the GT program thanks to a couple of coworkers who are either already in or strongly considering it. Its 100% online so it may not be the exact same program, but I expect the rigor to be high. I am hoping I can lean on the self study I have completed so far.

I am always open to further conversation offline! My email is abrett6 (at) vt (dot) edu if you'd like to shoot me a message.

"The Big Ten is always using excuses to cancel games with us. First Wisconsin. Then Wisconsin. After that, Wisconsin. The subsequent cancellation with Wisconsin comes to mind too. Now Penn State. What's next? Wisconsin?" -HorseOnATreadmill

speaking as a BIT grad from way back..

BIT grads talk to the coders and engineers so the customer doesn't have to

So what you're saying is...

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

The only reason I brought it up was because I thought it was atypical for a player to list his degree. Since he obviously is not gonna be a take at a big name football school, I wonder if he is angling for a smaller school that will have playing time for him that also academically has a top notch MBA program.

That could be a smart move for him.

Please forgive me, but with is BIT? Business and IT?

Either way, wishing him the best of luck wherever with his life and career - on or off the field.

Recovering scientist working in business consulting

Do you like Excel and PowerBI? Boy is BIT the major for you

Business Information Technology, yes. It's in the business school, and last I checked, the most popular major in business. It's sort of CS lite, and most of the people who do it end up either as a Systems Analyst or IT Consulting or similar.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

Pretty Much - send us you script kiddies we will teach them to speak manager.

I told him I’d crawl on my hands and knees to be the DL coach at Virginia Tech. Now, all of a sudden, I’m sitting in this chair and I told him I’d still crawl on my hands and knees to work here. I just want to be here.
JC Price

Your move Bowen. Go get some dudes at WR. We need them desperately or you will be looking for work

Honestly didn't think he was that bad. He got a lot of heat for that push off call against odu which I thought was a weak call to begin with. Was definitely better than many of our scholarship wide receivers

Free Hugh

Yeah after that and I think a bobbled/dropped punt return he basically disappeared completely and I don't think I ever saw him on the field again. I'll never forget the shock of seeing him listed as the second-string WR at two different positions to start the season lol.

Can we just rename this thread the butt-hurt and disaffected BIT majors complaining about engineers?

I'm still figuring this out.

Play nice

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

I literally just mean that this keeps popping up on the tracker and that is (at least half of the conversation, the other half being an attempt at kumbaya about how we aren't that different). Literally nothing about the walk on entering the portal.

It at least deserves an OT leader, I'm all for the discussion and particularly love the fact that I can happily recognize and understand those butthurt and disaffected BIT majors make more than me. And that's ok.

I'm still figuring this out.

Good thing you started a baity off-topicer discussion about the off-topic discussion, that'll definitely keep it from continuing to pop to the top of the tracker lol

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

We are often the cause of our own demise. I'm comfortable with that, and we're all here anyway. And counterpoint mine was meta-topic not off topic.

I'm still figuring this out.

lmao at the irony considering the content of the discussion you're complaining about.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

A live look at the butthurt BIT majors:

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

Send some of those dolla dolla bills to our NIL collective damn

Twitter me

Live look at engineers who weren't socially awkward and became sales engineers

TKPhi Damn Proud
BSME 2009

Also:

Live look at engineers who weren't socially awkward technically competent and became sales engineers

FTFY πŸ€ͺ

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Live look at engineers who weren't socially awkward or technically competent and became sales engineers product managers

Was this just me?

engineers who weren't socially awkward

or as most of us know them.....unicorns.

edit: when you have to edit your jokes they are much less funny

"Don't go to, go through"

I have been assured by multiple people that it is not possible for my jokes to get less funny.

Gonna catch so much flack for this but...

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I think I'm somewhere in there...yeah

Onward and upward

I think I made the comment above that started the whole sub thread you're complaining about. I graduated in ME long before BIT was even a degree. I am definitely not a butt hurt BIT major that couldn't cut it in engineering.

Honestly more of a musing, I didn't pay too much attention to handles or what was actually being said, more that a generalized comment (prolly yours) got blown way out of proportion for all the reasons that have been listed so far and found it funny that it kept going for like three days. Honestly part (small part) of why I'm here

I'm still figuring this out.

Of all the portal threads I thought would blow up, the Will Kakavitsas hit the transfer portal thread would not have made the list.

Is coronavirus over yet?

And yet it blew up for very OT reasons, which is a very TKP thing to do.

Peter Pan is the best peanut butter. And yes, crunchy.

I might have to strongly agree with you, but also state that I don't really like peanut butter so there's that.

I'm still figuring this out.

I grew up on Peter Pan, it is definitely one of the better ones.

VT Marketing Class of 2009
Current Roanoke-Hokie
Go Hokies!

Dukes.....

"Don't go to, go through"

In a barely related tangent, I had a PB&J burger from 80/20 Burger Bar in Norfolk the other day. It was my birthday and I was feeling adventurous.

House-made bacon peanut butter, pepper jelly, it was delicious. Almost a Thai flavor profile. Honey siracha sauce for the fries.

Jack Browns - Elvis Burger

I make them at home and people scoff at the idea of peanut butter and bacon on a burger until I make one for them and they contemplate how they've wasted their entire life up until that point.

VT Marketing Class of 2009
Current Roanoke-Hokie
Go Hokies!

Sorry your mom doesn't love you. Choosy moms choose Jif.

Choosy_Moms_Choose.gif

Obviously from my username, you can tell I have to politely agree to disagree with you on this. Skippy Creamy peanut butter is literally what I survive on; I go through a 48 oz jar in 2-3 days max along with a loaf of white bread every 1-2 days. But I don't proselytyze- if others choose differently, that just leaves more Skippy for me1

Note-in my lifetime, conservatively estimating, I have consumed well over 9 TONS of peanut butter.

From the 2018 VT-uva game-"This is when LEGENDS are made!"

Paging King James and his spreadsheet

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

On it! Skippy only consumes PB and white bread and will either die in their 50s or live to 105 with their organs perfectly preserved.

P.S. I like smuckers natural, just peanuts and salt the way Marcellus Gilmore Edson always intended, or well maybe John Harvey Kellogg.

The only way this could get better is if he chimes back in and says something like his wife eats a gallon of smuckers grape jelly every week

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

No jelly ever for me- I'm a purist-Skippy Creamy on white bread(lightly toasted or not), saltines, or on a spoon or knife straight from the jar. Divorced for 18 years but the ex was a fantastic cook whose talent was wasted on me, lol.

Side note-Though I was always a finicky eater even as a youngster, I nearly severed my tongue at age 8 (while playing with carboard moving box as a toboggan in front yard and holding tongue out like MJ) and got 15 stitches in it, so I'm not absolutely sure if I taste things the same as others do.

From the 2018 VT-uva game-"This is when LEGENDS are made!"

Definitely not a purist.
Peanut butter and banana
Peanut butter and Nutella
Peanut butter and Honey Nut Cheerios

But always creamy. None of that crunchy stuff.

I just convinced my wife to buy me a jar of marshmallow fluff for Fluffernutters

VT Marketing Class of 2009
Current Roanoke-Hokie
Go Hokies!

Creamy peanut butter, marshmallow fluff and Nutella in equal portions is a perfect spoonful of goodness.

Haven't tried that but, it sounds fantastic. Used to fluffanutters as kid when my mom would spurge and buy marshmallow fluff. Nutella wasn't really a thing back then.

Heck yes, Jelly has no place with PB!

Now waffles topped with PB and Syrup ... mmmm

Though creamy for waffles, chunky for sandwiches for me.

I love TKP.

Another white bronco? The first one didn't go too far.

Come for the football talk, stay for the career advice (/TIC πŸ˜‹)

"The Big Ten is always using excuses to cancel games with us. First Wisconsin. Then Wisconsin. After that, Wisconsin. The subsequent cancellation with Wisconsin comes to mind too. Now Penn State. What's next? Wisconsin?" -HorseOnATreadmill

More like KakaBITsas amirite

My seven year old has been playing Pokemon Platinum with my old Nintendo DS. Is this the best thread to ask for help if he gets stuck in any of the levels? Thanks!