NCAA allows certain sports to have on campus activities restart.

https://sports.yahoo.com/sources-ncaa-division-i-council-approves-volunt...

An NCAA vote Wednesday cleared the return of student-athletes to campus in football, men's basketball and women's basketball on June 1 through June 30, multiple sources told Yahoo Sports. This decision ends a moratorium on all athletic activities through May 31.

This doesn't necessarily mean a rush back to campus for those three sports, as those decisions will be made in concert with state government, local government, conference and university officials

I think this decisions is poorly done by the NCAA. Certain states *cough* the SEC ones will have "voluntary" workouts at midnight on June 1st.

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So the revenue sports can practice. Shocking. Good reminder that "Academics" is not in their name. Having said that, football baby!

I am staying as far away from any stadium as possible.

Comment Disclaimer: My comment are meant to be taken as-is. If you cannot handle it, do not hit ‘Reply All.’

So, like, the center of the Pacific Ocean? Bold strategy dude, keep us updated!

Please provide supporting evidence I said something about being in the Pacific Ocean. Thanks.

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I am staying as far away from any stadium as possible.

I hate sounding like a jackass, but the supporting evidence seems to be in your statement above and he was just being sarcastic. In all honesty, I haven't done the math to make sure the pacific is where you should be headed, though.

In plain English, it means I am staying far away from any stadiums, as in I am going stay away from people as in I am not going to attend any sporting events.

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Why is this getting downvoted? What part of the community guidelines does it violate?

Now finish up them taters; I'm gonna go fondle my sweaters.

Yeah, what is going on here? There is no justification for downvotes.

I did not downvote, but I would imagine the downvotes are coming from his responses to an obvious sarcastic joke. I can see something like this being downvoted on reddit because he is missing the joke and arguing needlessly.

Danny is always open
23 can't read

But if you were in the middle of the pacific ocean you would be even further away from the stadiums, wouldn't you? I know a guy who might be able to help your dreams become a reality. Don't sell yourself short, we can get you to that ocean!

Shame on the downvotes here.

This is what I've been fighting for during this entire pandemic. You are making a personal choice to stay at home. I have to respect that. That's what this should have been about the entire time.

Leonard. Duh.

This does raise the interesting question of where on earth is the furthest from any possible stadium.

Any sports stadium? I'd guess the artic or anartica

I said sports stadium, soccer isnt a real sport /s

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

Now this is peak offseason

Directions from Blacksburg to whoville, go north till you smell it then go east until you step in it

Wish I could find the link, but it is from years ago. Reminds me of a hilarious article by this guy who was trying to visit every country. Listed the least visited ones and had blurbs about why so few visit. North Korea was not even in the top (bottom?) 10. His comment for why so few visit North Korea was something like:

Do I even need to answer this?

Several least visited were Pacific Island countries and the why so few often amount to, just try and figure out how to get here or there is only 1 airline that services the country and they know how to price accordingly given their monopoly.

Edit: Found it! He is the same guy who set the record for visiting 5 continents in 1 day using only regularly scheduled commercial flights. Put that link below as well.

https://garfors.com/the-25-least-visited-countries-in-world-html/

https://kickasstrips.com/2016/06/continentrun-traveling-to-5-continents-...

Recovering scientist working in business consulting

I think this decisions is poorly done by the NCAA. Certain states *cough* the SEC ones will have "voluntary" workouts at midnight on June 1st.

It just means more.

El. Psy. Kongroo.

The revenue sports.

Good stuff, lets get back some normalcy

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

Cool so what's the plan? How much testing and how often? What happens when a staffer or player tests positive? This "get back to normal" talk ignores reality on the ground that you needs plans.

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

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The NCAA has a more comprehensive plan out there than anyone anticipated.

@hokie_rd

The NCAA plan relies heavily on state and local governments and their restrictions. Other questions haven't been answered and won't be be the NCAA because it will be up to individual conferences and schools.

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That's the whole point. The actual plan relies upon those, so lifting it allows them to govern timeline.

@hokie_rd

Then that isn't a plan. The NCAA should have held off until at a minimum the P5 conferences had plans in place. So now what happens when Tech calls players back and a player doesn't come because the ACC/Tech doesn't have a plan.

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Well Whit would be fired and / or heavily criticized across the country. I guess my point is that rash decisions may happen or some may want to them happen, but those individuals would then be playing Russian roulette with their reputation / career. I would hope the majority are smart enough to at least cover their ass even if they are dumb enough to put kids in jeopardy.

@hokie_rd

Honestly would you rather see the NCAA unveil a blanket policy for all of the country's schools when its been proven a more state by state or zone by zone policy works better as each place is going through this at a different stage? The NCAA is in a lose lose scenario here and by lifting the ban they will atleast be allowing each conference to know they can start planning for something. You cant force players back due to these extreme times but to criticize the NCAA solely because they havent written out a plan for every blade of grass is a bit pointless when they're relying on people in the government/health department to help configure plans for each respective zone.

Directions from Blacksburg to whoville, go north till you smell it then go east until you step in it

I'd rather the NCAA keep the lid on this until conferences have a plan. This is the same thing we are seeing from the Feds. Despite all training and plans prior to this current leadership local and state communities are having the burden placed on them. There should be an overall plan: NCAA: "until schools and conferences have testing plans and quarantine plans in place the ban on in person practices will remain" why is this so hard to understand?
The OP and his "get back to normal" isn't based in facts, reality or planning for disasters (which is what a pandemic is).

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

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There should be an overall plan: NCAA: "until schools and conferences have testing plans and quarantine plans in place the ban on in person practices will remain" why is this so hard to understand?

Probably because you keep saying "have a plan" but then representing the "plan" as "our grand plan is for everyone else to determine their own plans"

that's not a plan, that's passing the buck.

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

That's better than the current NCAA plan: nothing. They have zero requirements of schools and conferences prior to students coming back to campus for in person workouts. None. We do this all the time; prior to giving out grants or equipment or training your agency needs a plan on how it will be used. It's the standard.

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The NCAA has no authority to do any of this. They have little authority to do anything, frankly, and they have to abide by whatever the federal, state, or local government says. All they are saying here is "if your locality is OK with this, you can proceed with what you want to do." Any school that subsequently doesn't have policies and plans assumes the risk associated with being unprepared. VT will probably not allow players back on June 1 because our plan is being formulated, both for summer on-campus activities (research, etc) and for what we are going to do in the fall.

I have to disagree NCAA requires compliance offices to meet standards on all kinds of issues every day. They don't have to approve your plan you just have to have a plan in place and the NCAA can then open it up. This is going to create a hodgepodge of different levels of not only safety but teams being better prepared than their peers for the upcoming season.

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Aren't compliance offices just for meeting academic standards and amateur status issues?

Why in the world would the NCAA get involved with what Virginia Tech or East Western State has in place to combat virus outbreaks. Are they going to come in and count fire extinguishers and run tornado drills?

At most, the only aspect of this the NCAA is worried about is that there is no cheating with extra practice, etc.

Leonard. Duh.

Compliance and NCAA rules also deal with player safety.

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

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Yeah, player safety with how it relates to the game... targeting, excessive practice, etc. Not pandemic response.

The NCAA posture of... If your school and local authorities are cool, we're cool is a good tact to take.

Leonard. Duh.

Bottom Line. NCAA only cares about revenue. Otherwise, they would have a consistent message for all sports athletes, but it appears as posted above they are only letting revenue sports back. So does the NCAA only care about the safety of non-revenue sports athletes, and they don't care about revenue-sports athletes? Makes zero sense.

HH4455

The NCAA doesn't make money off of anything besides the NCAA tournament. (Just pointing that out... not necessarily an argument.)

Bottom Line - Everybody cares about revenue... because there hasn't been any. LIke I've said before. This is not about some Tycoon sitting on a throne somewhere in Dixieland burning all of his football money in his fireplace. This is about ensuring cash flow into athletic departments everywhere so that all of the non-revenue athletes everyone is so worried about actually have unis, equipment, and gas money.

Leonard. Duh.

Maybe it's because those sports are the next ones due back to campus.

Or that's just what I heard from the guy on sports radio who's been talking to coaches of all sports.

Wouldn't baseball, softball, lax be actually going on currently in a normal year? Why weren't they allowed back?

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Actually, all of those sports would be in postseason play right now. By June 1, lacrosse would be completely over, softball would be in the middle of their world series, and baseball would be just starting their tournament.

So yes those teams would be playing. Also why weren't other fall sports included in this? Again it's odd only three sports were mentioned by the NCAA release.

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Not saying anyones right or wrong this is all that pops up when people keep asking why only these three sports.

Directions from Blacksburg to whoville, go north till you smell it then go east until you step in it

It's not some big conspiracy, dude, it's just being practical.

Spring sports were going to be over by that date anyway. Not to mention that the spring season was straight up cancelled. There's no reason to deal with them right now.

Most of the other fall sports report at a later date.

Right. Those teams MIGHT be playing. The lax championships are typically on Memorial Day, so before June 1. Why would you bring back spring sports for 3 days of practice to make them leave.

Plus, like you said, the seasons were cancelled. Hard to scramble to bring things back when it was called off.

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

So, normal operating procedures. Not every team (school) has the same schedule. Not every team offers the same support. Not every team offers the same food/weight room/doctors/training/etc.

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

But every team has to abide by practice limits. Which is what this is.

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Correct, the same as they always do...

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

But this changes that. Every SEC school will have every player back June 1st at midnight doing "voluntary workouts" that won't be the standard across the country.

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What do you think the kids do on campus during the summer under normal circumstances?

And this is in the vain of player safety. You can't take 3 weeks to get football players in football shape.

You're concerned the SEC will have a competitive advantage on the field? Again, how is this different?

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

If it's within the limits of the rules, why is that so abhorent? Using your example of midnight madness, you don't think that every school in the ACC has the resources to get kids on campus at midnight 6/1 if they choose to do so?

I'm just not seeing the purpose of your outrage. Working out at midnight on 6/1 is not going to be the reason that the SEC outperforms the Sunbelt Conference. The 5 star athletes falling off of trees and landing in Baton Rouge, Tuscaloosa, and Athens probably has a little more to do with that.

Leonard. Duh.

The plan is that life has to continue. I say this as an immunocompromised person with two young kids that are also at risk (my 3.5 year old has been hospitalized 3 times for flu in her short life) and whose mom is in her late 60's and stepdad in his late 70's. All 3 of my kids are currently suffering from severe depression because they miss their friends, grandparents, sports, scouting, and all the normal parts of life which to me is a real tangible risk that currently exists. I weigh this verse a possible risk that is so controversial that all the "experts" change their minds 20 times a day on how dangerous it is, how transmittable it is, how many people are actually infected, etc. I weigh it against my wife getting laid off and unemployment not being enough to help keep our heads above water. Everyone has to make their own decisions, if they want to return to normal life they should have that choice.

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

That's the thing about transmitted diseases your choices don't just impact you. We are seeing things open up but with smart restrictions like limited capacity and masks being required. You don't just go back to normal and open the faucet wide open. You have plans, do the schools have contact tracing plans? What will be social distancing rules? Masks? Quarantine for symptomatic staff players and coaches. These are all things that should be answered and won't be in 11 days.

Wet stuff on the red stuff.

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I have a real question. You say that your choices dont just impact you, i am assuming you mean by one person making the choice to go about and live freely vs an individual who would rather stay home and self quarantine; how do these impact eachother if the one person is staying home?

Because there are plenty of people who don't have a choice on if they have to go out. From public safety to hospital to infrastructure jobs.

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right, and they can make the decision to wear a mask or if they arent feeling well to get tested and take necessary precautions. i am one of those, i work as construction supervisor and go to multiple factories a week across the east coast, it is possible to do this and be curtious to others.

The point is by people not wearing masks or doing things like social distancing they are making choices that impact others not just themselves. Here is what I told the guy screaming at the Mexican restaurant last Friday.

Our forefathers have taken great risks and made great sacrifices for us. The least you can do is wear a mask and not get in peoples bubble. Be a hero.

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"Our forefathers have taken great risks and made great sacrifices for us"...

also to be able to assemble and worship freely without an imposing government telling us we can't do that.

Leonard. Duh.

That's not fully true, all rights have always had limits imposed. But we are heading towards community guidelines here.

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Obviously I can't practice religion that calls for human sacrifice.

My point is that our forefathers did not risk their lives in order to form a government that would tell us to stay home and totally annihilate the economy over this situation.

That last part is in italics because I definitely DO NOT want to get into an argument with you over what "this situation" is, because we severely fundamentally disagree on it.

Leonard. Duh.

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank

The difficulty is most masks don't prevent you from getting the virus, it prevents you from spreading it. So if I have to go out, i'm not protecting myself wearing a mask, im protecting my fellow humans around me.

El. Psy. Kongroo.

Correct.

And when someone isn't wearing a mask, or socially distancing, they're failing to protect you.

I used to think traveling Asians who wore masks were worried about their health. Possibly, but it was also a societal courtesy to protect others. So I should have been thanking them.

I agree, legs for both

Also, my initial question was not aimed at these types of individuals, more so the actual opposites of these essential personnel

I weigh this verse a possible risk that is so controversial that all the "experts" change their minds 20 times a day on how dangerous it is, how transmittable it is, how many people are actually infected, etc.

That's not controversial, that's how real time science works. You get more data, you adjust your view and interpretation of the data.

El. Psy. Kongroo.

All the way Jander. At this point, it is clear, we are doing way more damage than the virus itself. A lot of things still make me nervous about the virus and the unknowns, but I am ready to live life again.

A lot that we can all say about this. But these words by CS Lewis are pretty great and applicable to the current situation. Life is full of risks, yet we continue to live life in spite of these risks. The Covid risk has been a big unknown and in many ways still is; but at the end of the day we have to learn to treat it like any other risk and live our lives. Everyone should be able to do what they are comfortable doing. If you want to go out and shop and socialize you should be able to do that along with anyone else that may want to. And if you want to go back to school and practice and play your sport and earn your degree, you should be able to do that too. But if you want to take extra precautions, then do so. Hopefully we can all get to that place soon.

I'm not going to argue opinions, only point out that it is objectively not clear "we are doing way more damage than the virus itself" since I see this talking point a lot. The fact is we don't and can't know what the fallout would have been if no measures were put in place. What we do know is that even with extreme measures and many precautions, we've had 100,000 deaths in two months. That's insane! That's an extremely high death toll, and while it'll be years until we can even properly guess what the precise outcome would have been with zero precautions, I think it's safe to say that it could be many times greater given how far and how quickly the virus would have reached.

And of course, everyone wants to get back to normal and get to that place you're talking about. But baseless conjecture and focusing on the downsides of the mitigation while ignoring the victories as well as the realities of your alternative doesn't help anyone and doesn't get us closer. Coming up with feasible plans and smart solutions does. The irony, of course, is that all of the people talking about getting back to normal no matter the cost are parroting the talking points of people who are doing nothing to get us back to normal, while everyone else is working on a way to continue life that balances risk and normalcy in a sustainable way.

Another thing to consider, just opening everything up and allowing people to do "what they are comfortable doing" isn't any kind of panacea. What happens when the virus spreads rapidly, and another 100,000 die in a month? Then there's real panic, a haphazard shutdown, and no real way forward. At the end of the day, both paths involves risk, but only one involves a risk that we can manage and plan for.

Thank you for articulating this. I had a response typed but I had to delete it because it was not constructive. We are not just taking risks for ourselves here. The analysis has to go deeper than "what is best for me".

This is a great response.

I certainly understand this viewpoint and agree with it to a large degree. I'm on the fence and go back and forth on a lot of this, what should we be doing collectively, what should I be doing individually, what numbers and data to believe, etc. Not easy.

I live in NC. One thing I can look at objectively is a comparison of the numbers in different places that have responded differently. NC and Sweden make for one of the best comparisons we can make. Both have a population near 10.5M. The largest cities, Stockholm and Charlotte are very similar in population. Stockholm is denser (less land area), but Sweden has more land area overall. As we know, NC lock down order went into effect on MArch 27th. Sweden did not lock down. North Carolinians have social distanced and taking much more caution than Sweden. Sweden and NC had their first death from Covid within a few days of each other. Sweden is currently at 389 deaths per Million and NC is at 71 deaths per Million.

Obviously, there are many factors playing into virus spread. But, this is still a pretty good comparison and one of the best that we can easily make. One can make a strong case that the response in NC has significantly slowed the spread and reduced number of deaths. On the flip side, and you even stated, even with extremem measures the virus is still spreading. It appears we cannot totally eliminate it; and it looks like NC will eventually reach similar death tolls as Sweden.

The goal was to always "flatten the curve". Maybe Sweden didn't do enough to protect the vulnerable populations. Maybe NC has done too much and damaged their economy. All of this is hard to quantify. But my kids are at home, pining for social interaction with other children, sad to not be in school. My wife and I have been working double time to save the business we started in 2018. And the data actually supports that just mild social distancing in Sweden hasn't led to outrageous death tolls.

I also worry about sending kids to school this fall, enforcing masks and a no touch policy. Kids need affection and they need to learn how to show affection. They need to be able to touch. And I worry that we are going to be teaching young children in their most impressionable years to be fearful of other people, fearful of touching, hugging, high-fiving, etc. If we emphasize that too much and for too long, it will have a long term impact. We need to think about what that impact may be and what it could mean.

Just re-reasding your middle paragraph. It was not "baseless conjecture", and hopefully you can see from my repsonse above, that I am not "focusing only on downsides of mitigation and ignoring victories". I would argue that you aren't considering enough of the damage being done due to the lockdowns. Lives have been ruined, people are going without proper medical care because they are fearful of going to hospital. There is so much to consider there. I'm not "parroting talking points", I'm stating real facts. And I certainly wasn't trying to say in my original post that we just get back to normal without "balancing the risk"; quite the opposite actually.

And like you, I'm not trying to argue opinions. I'm trying to objectively present a broad perspective. My original post only focused on the upsides for opening back up and getting back to normal. Hopefully my repsonse above shows you that I am considering more than just that.

most likely something along the lines of what most factories are currently running: taking temperatures in the morning, issuing a face mask upon entry, and having several hand sanitizing stations set up at every corner. What all of the local factories (re: White Wave, Pilgrims Pride, George's, Hershey, Hollister, Interchange, Cargill, etc) are doing in the event of an individual contracting the virus is requiring them to stay at home for two weeks and testing those that they come into regular contact with. This has been working well since February. The closest thing to a true breakout at any of these facilities has been at PPM Moorefield, where a little over 20 individuals have caught it. Most of the employees are 21-55yo at all these facilities (all have had more than two cases, all work in close proximity to each other), they have all made full recoveries.

I know there's a saying that the wait and see'ers will bust your ass every time, but when it comes to public health during a pandemic, I think it's a wise strategy.

The problem I see is the states where the major football programs are going to force the more cautious schools/states into bringing people in when they are not comfortable in doing so.

On this forum, we've clearly singled out the SEC as being a driving force behind this decision. Defending national champions LSU are in a state that has 760 cases per 100,000 residents - 8th worst in the nation (5th worst in deaths per 100k), worst among SEC schools. The worst hit states are in ACC and Big Ten areas led by New York (Syracuse), New Jersey (Rutgers), and Massachusetts (BC).

As someone who married a Hokie Public Admin graduate with a specialty in Public Health and Epidemiology, I have learned how bad the idea of athletics are at this juncture.

As someone who is familiar with logistics is apprehensive about the idea of trying to get ~130 athletes, plus strength and conditioning staff among three sports enough time in facilities while adhering to recommended distancing and crowd reduction guidelines to be properly conditioned in fourteen weeks.

Never Forget #1 Overall Seed UVA 54, #64 UMBC 74

This also seems relevant. All of this is just nuts in how fast it changes- yesterday I felt like there wasn't a way they would play, and fans wouldn't be able to attend. But here we are...

I think a lot of athletic departments are running the numbers on playing without fans and realizing that it isn't economically feasible to do this without butts in the seats.

Imagine the economic cost of potential class action negligence suits if people get sick or die and it's traced to exposure at a sporting event.

Never Forget #1 Overall Seed UVA 54, #64 UMBC 74

That's not gonna happen. It's your choice to attend or not. If an old person at a football game catches the flu and passes away, there's no lawsuit. The university or organization is not responsible for that and if they feel pressure of crazy lawsuits, they could surely just include some language in the ticket sales saying that there may be a risk if you attend.

I'm not sure if there should be fans or not, because I don't have all the info necessary. But lawsuits from fans are not a concern imo.

I imagine there will be some kind of waiver, "by purchasing this ticket, you are acknowledging the risk of catching COVID-19, yadda yadda yadda"

Now finish up them taters; I'm gonna go fondle my sweaters.

Yep, just like if you go to a race (at least I know at Indy this is the case) and you read the fine print on the back of the ticket you basically take on all responsibility if you are killed or maimed by crash debris flying into the stands.

Hypothetical: I go to a bar and meet a friend. At the bar, the friend tells me he isn't feeling well, the next day he comes down with the flu. A few days later, my grandmother and I both come down with the flu. My grandmother has emphysema, the flu turns to pneumonia, and she dies. So I can sue the bar? Yeah, I don't think so.

Now, maybe there is a case where a coach or staff member gets Covid and becomes fatally ill and possibly dies. Maybe there is a legal case if the family can somehow prove negligence. So I do think Universities will come back, but they'll have to somehow accommodate those that are potentially vulnerable. It appears, the NCAA is correctly going to leave that up to the individual Universities and colleges.

the comparisons with the flu breakdown because scale matters. The yearly flu has an R0 value of 1.3 (each infected person, on average, infects 1.3 other people). Covid has an R0 value between 2-3. We'll call it 2 to help your argument. If you have the flu and pass it to 1.3 people and that chain continues for 10 transmissions, a total of 13 have gotten the flu. If you have Covid and pass it to 2 people and that chain continues for 10 transmissions, 1,024 people have gotten covid. And if the R0 value is 3 instead, that number is 59,000. When you have transmission rates like that, and businesses/schools know about it, you can argue negligence if they choose to proceed as normal. Technically everything is "do at your own risk" and yet we have a long, illustrious history in this country of holding businesses accountable when they allow people to participate in unsafe activities when the business knows about the risks ahead of time.

For comparison, ebola sits around R0=2. If people got sick and bled out the eyes from COVID, I can assure you, this wouldn't even be a conversation. The flip side is that ebola is very visible and is only transmitted when you are symptomatic. Covid requires the population to use their brains and take steps to fight transmission because a chunk of those infected will never know it, but still pass it on to those around them.

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

I'm familiar with the R-value. And R-values change over the course of the pandemic. I was simply using the flu in that hypothetical to make the point that the bar is not at fault. Nor should the bar be to blame if the same thing happened with covid. And universities will not be to blame when some contracts covid at a football game.

The transmissibility is clearly higher than flu based solely on what is happening in nursing homes. Yes, people need to use their brains. People also need to continue being people. We are a social species and as Jander pointed out, if we continue this indefinitely we run the risk of doing serious harm to children by forcing such anti-social behaviors on them. Socialization is ultra-important for children. Are we seriously going to restrict Kindergarten teachers from hugging their students moving forward? We have to use our brains for more than just fighting covid, but living with it.

With regard to NCAA...shouldn't the student athletes and coaches and staff have some say in the matter? Shouldn't they have a choice? Or does their passion for football, basketball, their college career, potential pro career get taken from them? What do all the coaches and staff members do? How are they to make a living? Are their jobs taken from them for the next year? How do you weigh that cost against the risk of letting college athletics resume?

I'm 73 and my wife is 78. We are season ticket holders and you can bet your sweet ass our butts will be in Lane this fall.

foresthokie
US Navy Vet

Hopefully with masks. :)

Maroon Effect- hand out maroon masks
Orange Effect- orange masks

kinda would look cool on tv

you better be loud because you might be all alone

HH4455

If they open to fans...Lane will be 75-80% full due to cheaper tix, maybe even sold out.

I doubt it, I've talked to ~40 VT and NCSU grads over last 3 months, many of them reg season ticket holders or at least see multiple games each season, and none plan to enter a stadium anytime soon, certainly not in the fall; but if you're right, I guess there'll be new meaning to doing the "wave"...as in second wave

HH4455

I know this is a deeply secondary concern for most people but it's gonna be so lame if our end of the Penn State home and home is played in an empty stadium with no gate revenue or recruit exposure and they get the full end of the deal in a few years.

True. But that's certainly luck of the draw.

Nobody would have predicted this.

Wisconsin saw it coming which is why they rescheduled for 2077 when they knew fans would be back.

"What are you going to do, stab me? - Quote from Man Stabbed

Yeah, they wanted to be on the safe side, and those vaccines can take a while.

This is Pure Gold Leonard Approved.

Well done.

On another note, I don't see the big deal with students getting back to campus. The logic of "Sure... you can work at the grocery store and risk exposure to the virus in public, Joe College... but no way you're going back to school makes no sense.

Leonard. Duh.

There are concerns with housing and shared spaces in dorms that need to be worked out.

More importantly, it's safer for the athletes if students don't go back.

Yeah not saying anybody should have seen this coming or is at fault but it sucks. The only bright side of a season getting straight-up cancelled is we would probably have our game against them re-scheduled and be able to do it properly, but otherwise there's basically no way that home-and-home hasn't just become a wasted opportunity that will wind up benefitting only one side.

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction:
“I served in the United States Navy"

KCCO

well, on the positive side, there's this great quote: "Even for the most financially stable athletics programs, the days of $75 million coaching contracts, $55 million football facilities, bloated support staffs, multimillion-dollar buyouts for losing coaches and steak and lobster dinners for recruits might be over."

HH4455

The ACC says it is up to institutions to decide when to start practicing, etc. and Louisville has already announced they will start on June 1st- and it seems like VT is going to as well.

I can't wait for football as much as the next guy but with the worst covid days 1,000 new cases in my state (NC) and 1,200 I'm VA, I am a little nervous about things getting things being relaxed so quickly

Certainly seems like everything is moving very quickly right now. Almost feels like March/May madness has been the momentum swings on what the future would look like.

NCDHHS hasn't reported 1000 new cases in day based on their website. Highest was in the 800's. Seeing daily new cases rise in May compared to April, because NC is doing significantly more testing compared to April and early May. The % of tests that come back positive are level at around 7%. Hospitalizations have bounced between 450 and 550 since about April 23rd (1 month). A lot has opened back up, more people are out, but everyone is still being very cautious when out, and we aren't seeing an exponential rise so far.

That could all change, of course. However, I think it is important that we go to serious lengths to test the waters this summer. Doing so will allow the state to make a more informed decision on the upcoming school year and what to do about public schools. That is the biggest decision ahead of them. Better to test the waters during the summer months before such critical decisions are made.

Also, the data is always changing, but last I saw in NC...nursing homes, residential care facilities, and correctional facilities made up 22% of the cases in NC, but 62% of the deaths (53% nursing homes). There are ways to resume normal activities with basic caution, while protecting nursing homes. Just have a plan in place to identify outbreaks early.

It may seem like we are opening things up quickly, but we are opening them up a lot slower than we shut them down.

WARNING: NOT A SERIOUS RESPONSE, JUST AN INJECTION OF LEVITY

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Can't wait for June 1 and the first football press conference of the summer!

To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
@BuryHokie #ThanksFrank