Whit Talks NIL

Link Here. Whit Interview starts at about the 8 minute mark, goes until the 30 min mark. As always, my summary below is my interpretation. I recommend listening because you may hear a different message than I did 🤷‍♂️

About 5 minutes in, it became clear that this interview isn't geared towards the super fan (like me) who has spent all off-season reading article after article on NIL. Rather, I think it's primarily for people who (a) want to get involved, but don't know how, or (b) are wary of getting involved (possibly more 'traditional' donors who might need some encouraging that NIL isn't evil)

Reoccurring Themes:

  • Whit wants VT to be competitive in NIL, but also wants to make sure recruits in every sport "pick Virginia Tech because it's Virginia Tech," not just for the money.
  • VT wants to differentiate themselves by making NIL as easy and athlete friendly as possible (my words, not Whit's):
    • Lots of examples of support from the school to help athletes; from mentors on brand management to advisors who will review the contract and make sure athletes aren't being taken advantage of.
    • Three collectives, each with a different purpose: one non-profit focused, one primarily football focused (but does some other sports), one primarily basketball focused, (but does some other sports too).
    • The collectives have all access to video production equipment/professionals, contract lawyers, etc
    • Additionally, One two-way marketplace (Hokie Exchange) that matches businesses to players.
  • NIL is something the athletic department works on daily (this is said multiple times throughout the interview).
  • When discussing the positives and negatives of NIL, Whit points out two negatives that never occurred to me:
    • The recruiting process is more complicated; in addition to talking to coaches from each school, recruits must communicate with the people who work at collectives at each school
    • Also mentions a few instances at other programs (doesn't say which, but says it hasn't happened at VT) where an NIL provider makes a promise but doesn't deliver.
  • Multiple professional sports comparisons:
    • Believes that the facilities arm race will slow down soon as NIL becomes more of a selling point to recruits, and donor money that would have in the past go to facilities goes to NIL. Says NFL players don't pick teams based on the locker room
    • Whit made multiple comments that he would like NIL to move 'in house', says in 2-5 years it could be professionalized, mentioned a review sharing, etc. Said this could possibly be a less expensive model
  • Mentions 'the courts' (multiple times) needing to pass a law to standardize NIL. My reading-between-the-lines of his repeated comments is that he's not confident in the courts to pass something, but he feels it's the only way NIL can work long term.

Final Quotes:

  • "I really do feel like we as Virginia Tech are ahead of the curve on the structure, our platform, our strategy, the way we do NIL. We do need some help with the funding, the investment, and the Name, Image, and Likeness dollars."
  • "Ultimately, I think NIL could be a less expensive model for us, so I'd encourage people to keep an open mind, learn more about it"

My Takeaways:

  • Whit's obviously taking NIL seriously. Although that's expected, I find it's still reassuring to hear - I feel like I haven't heard about VT much in the NIL news/rumor mill, so it was nice to hear Whit talking about it.
  • Kinda confirms my suspicion that we have the infrastructure in place but need the money.
  • I found the 'negatives' really interesting. I've heard about players getting one sided contracts, but not about players getting getting straight up duped. I also can't imagine getting recruited by a coaching staff, but also by the leaders of an NIL collective from each school.
  • I'm really happy that Whit is talking about professionalization. 4 years ago I was very pro-NIL and very anti-revenue sharing. My opinion has swung drastically over the last couple years (for a variety of reasons), so I'm relieved to see that Whit is forward-thinking on this matter.
Forums: 
DISCLAIMER: Forum topics may not have been written or edited by The Key Play staff.

Comments

Whit wants VT to be competitive in NIL, but also wants to make sure recruits in every sport "pick Virginia Tech because it's Virginia Tech," not just for the money.

To be fair, I'd be ok if players chose VT for the money and then found out it was a great place.

This is my school
This is home

i think there was a lot woven into that statement:

  • I think it's a veiled way of saying we're short in NIL funding
  • Strategically, players who go to a school just for the money are more likely to transfer (Whit talks about this briefly - no hard numbers, but says that he hears that from the coaches)
  • IMO this was a little bit of pandering to the 'traditionalists' who think that paying players could destroy the moral fabric our university

Bit that's just my interpretation. You should listen and see if you agree.

Twitter me

I know you're just the messenger, but I just have to roll my eyes at the "only in it for the money" sentiment that I don't doubt is out there. I'm not saying it's all about the money, but get real, top athletes can and should expect top NIL. Just like the professional world, stuff like work/life balance, liking your boss, etc matters but we all know damn well that that 15+% raise by the other guy might make us stop to consider.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Jet Sweep

I tend to agree with this.

Twitter me

I don't think that was the point. I don't think the sentiment is that its wrong or people are pollyanna about it. My take was that guys looking solely for the best deal as their #1 priority probably aren't finished with looking for the best deal - and that's a losing game for VT.

For what it's worth, studies have shown money is not the #1 motivator generally when choosing to leave or stay in a job. It's why most companies generally don't get into a negotiation over money - people are generally leaving over more than money.

But for some it is purely money...

My unofficial college football study disproves this - because the teams with the most fucking money win the most fucking games. So it is about money in this sport

Wow, shocking...yet again you post a non-sequitur to tell us what you think.

For what it's worth, studies have shown money is not the #1 motivator generally when choosing to leave or stay in a job. It's why most companies generally don't get into a negotiation over money - people are generally leaving over more than money.

I think stay/leave a job is different than accepting a job. You typically accept a job for money. You leave/stay based on a lot of other things.

Twitter me

Sure. Like money, and the rest of the stuff.

It's all about respect, and it turns out money=respect.

Lots of things = respect.

Not necessarily although those reasons are usually accompanied by more money.

Do you think money was the top motivator for Brent Pry when he took the VT job or left the PSU DC job?

The really funny thing about NIL is all the schools who seemed to just seamlessly transition to it and keep the recruits flocking in were the ones who were basically already funneling money to players, they just switched their under the table system to one out in the open.

Is it really out in the open?

Or is it just a different structure?

It's out in the open in the sense you can talk about players getting paid without getting investigated (yet) and people aren't rolling their eyes anymore when athletes are driving $100k vehicles. On the flipside lots of the contract details are unknown since ya know it's a contract between two entities/people.

This is my point. This format isn't really transparent, either.

That said, this format is probably a lot more lucrative for most players.

The way NIL is structured now, or rather not structured because there are no real rules (thanks a lot NCAA), is a crock of BS. The way I understood it and what I supported was that athletes should be compensated by the universities whenever their Name, Image, or Likeness was used by said university (or official partner) to sell or promote anything, whether it was merchandise through the university store or an affiliate, their face on a promotion, etc. Not that independent 3rd parties who didn't exist before the supreme court case could swoop in and start paying players by setting up endorsement deals that are little more than half-assed coverups. No one is buying anything besides school merchandise because a college player "endorses" it.

God, I hate how much the NCAA sat back and did the literal "Jesus take the wheel".

My comment 3.5 years ago.

Exactly! If you think VT can't compete with the Bama and OSUs now, just wait until this becomes reality. Do u really think all the marketing money will be legit? Johnnys car lot will be paying $20 mil for Five Star Player X to advertise their 1988 Corolla worth $200. I just wish it were that simple. Players should be allowed to make money on the side (image, or whatever) but I've been around long enough to know this will be a recruiting ploy for the boosters with the most money.

The funny thing is, Bama and OSU are actually behind in NIL infrastructure - You've seen Saban and Day both hammering donors about this.

The teams who are really accelerating - Tennessee, Miami, Nebraska, USC, - are all 'former' powers.

Twitter me

are actually behind in NIL infrastructurethat's visible

They still have bagmen also.

This is going to be great for the ACC.

Bama bagmen have been cheap for years now (relative to pre-saban norms). Bama is basically guaranteed to put you in the NFL, and draft money >>> Bagmen money. Saban doesn't cheat because he doesn't need to - kids will play there without/with a small bag. Same with OSU. But now that's changing with NIL.

Twitter me

No one is buying anything besides school merchandise because a college player "endorses" it.

this isn't true. I agree that maybe nobody is specifically going to go to Newman & Blackstock for their eye exams just because your starting right guard jumps into a local tv spot, but if Olivia Dunne says she's a fabletics girl, that has some sway. If Heisman winner Caleb Williams starts endorsing a specific protein bar, that has some sway. etc etc etc

there are college players with tens of thousands of social media followers (or more!) -- companies pay for the platform and the reach into a given demographic

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

Newman & Blackstock for their eye exams just because your starting right guard jumps into a local tv spot

Should use a squeaky shoes player for an eye doc commercial. "See the shot better with ..."

There's a cheeky way for athlete in any sport to complain about refereeing lol

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller

Not that independent 3rd parties who didn't exist before the supreme court case could swoop in and start paying players by setting up endorsement deals

This is flat out wrong - this was the intent all along. Players can paid for autographs, appearances at birthday parties, appearances at summer camps, coaching lessons, etc. The idea is that an athlete should be an 'influencer' and 'entrepreneur' - and to be fair, a lot of athletes are doing this.

What was unforeseen was this idea of a collective, where boosters would pool money in an LLC, and that LLC would pay to be endorsed.

I still think that as NIL ages, we see a few busts, and the market becomes more transparent, it will come back down to reality.

Twitter me

I'll give you that, I didn't think of those kinds of scenarios. It just shows how murky the whole subject is and that it's a very fluid and gray matter currently.

I think that VT has the right approach. Partner with our players and offer them the back end support they need to get paid but to do it legally.

I think the "influencer/entrepreneur" comparison is apt. There are 12 year olds getting paid to endorse products on social media. Why not college football players?

This is a good interview to get out in public and discuss NIL. It hits the major points without getting too detailed, and keeps the average fan and donor engaged.

TKPhi Damn Proud
BSME 2009

Thanks for summarizing the interview.

https://apple.news/AVFBUwBKpQ3SZ1folKA3ulA

I'm down with this. Why? This type activity can be done at any football program regardless of national prominence. Not saying it's an even playing field, but you don't have to be Alabama/Ohio State/UGA to make this work. For example, let's say GT recruits an Atlanta high 4* and shows how they will "market" him with this type NIL activity. A "home town" stud stays home, goes to a great University, and becomes the "home town football hero" his freshman/sophomore year. Then scheduled photo/autograph sessions throughout the offseason in various GA markets (Savannah, Macon, All of ATL, etc). The kid would make bank.

This is the sort of stuff that collectives often organize. The criticism is that the pay may be 'above market value' - if you pay a collegiate athlete $500k for 1 hour of autograph signings, is that fair?

Twitter me

...is that fair?

No, but the unfairness shifts from benefitting the very, very few to simply the few.

Not great, but a little less terrible than it was maybe.

That sums it up. Today, NIL is for the few indeed and will probably never be something every member on a roster will be able to benefit from on an individual basis. But, we don't know how this will evolve exactly. So many scenarios at play. For example, all individual NIL earnings will be docked X% to go the the athletic dept to help support all sports, or something to that effect.

The way I read it is the "fee menu items" are what is available if a fan attends the event and want to purchase one of the items. So, it's a "day of" affair. If so, I don't think the kid could autograph enough stuff to make $500k in an hour. Now, I may have misread how it works within the article but see it synonyms with a book signing event.

Not near as much (legit) money in cards and autographs as you think.

Any idea what the athletes are making off of NIL here at VT?

Favorite play that never was - "Hooker with the dime to Pimp...leton."

The offensive line was getting a free meal a week from Mission BBQ I think.

Nowhere near what players are making elsewhere

This is my school
This is home

Everyone talks about equity and fairness etc. Where in America does any fucking 18 year old make 13 million dollars? Where? Silicon Valley? The NBA? Where? Nowhere. Nowhere. 18 year old privates in the Marines make 20K per year. This is beyond fairness. Fairness would be 15 bucks an hour for an unproven 18 year old.

Athletics Roster Building isn't about fairness; it's about getting the best players. If someone wants to take a $13M risk on an unproven 18 year old, that's their decision. Maybe the upside is a natty. The downside is a wasted $13M. That kid making $13M doesn't have an effect on an 18 year old making $20k per year.

Twitter me

THE argument for paying players cash to play ...errr (NIL) was fairness. That was the whole argument. It's not fair that pry makes millions but the players don't get paid cash. There is no other argument against amateurism in college athletics.

There is no other argument against amateurism in college athletics.

I've always felt the argument for NIL is that it's unethical for a monopoly to artificially limit one's earning power - whether that person is a player, a GA, a coach, or referee.

That was the whole argument. It's not fair that pry makes millions but the players don't get paid cash.

Pry has the rights to his Name, Image, and Likeness. He can open a bar in Blacksburg and call it Pry's Turkey Bar. In a pre-NIL world, NCAA athletes could not. Pry can sell autographs for cash. In a pre-NIL world, NCAA athletes could not. Pry can charge for appearance fees at summer camps or donor events. In a pre-NIL world, NCAA athletes could not.

Professional athletes negotiate compensation with their employers, but are free to explore a variety of business opportunities outside of that professional relationship. NCAA Athletes essentially negotiate compensation with their 'employer' (the are given a take-it-or-leave-it compensation offer from a school - which is fine), but (until now) were prevented from exploring ANY business opportunities outside of their 'professional' relationship. This is the part that is/was unethical.

Twitter me

Players sign a letter of intent that binds them to amateurism rules- like you sort of have to be a student here, you can't take cash from boosters, you can't benefit in a way a normal student can't etc. That's called a contract, and it's not unethical the milisecond you sign it. Would you sign an offer letter with a company if you thought the terms were unethical? no you wouldn't.

I would agree if there was an alternative - I'm not sympathetic to baseball players who can enter the minors out of high school. College football players don't have that option (because the NCAA effectively has a monopoly on college football).

Players sign a letter of intent that binds them to amateurism rules- like you sort of have to be a student here, you can't take cash from boosters, you can't benefit in a way a normal student can't etc.

A few comments above, you mentioned that it was unfair that coaches get paid millions when athletes did not. In my opinion, fairness isn't about making the same amount of money; it's about playing by the same rules. Coaches can move freely across the NCAA. Players cannot. Coaches can make income from places other than their employer (who is the same body that employs the NCAA athlete). In a pre-NIL world, players could not.

So, when you were upset (for lack of a better term) that a recruit received an (ultimately, failed) inducement for (up to) $13M, I don't see this as any different from Frank Beamer getting paid to take a picture with Camp Sauce, or boosters paying for Nick Saban's mortgage, or boosters paying for Lincoln Riley's family to use a private jet.

I dunno, go get your money kid, it doesn't make my life any different if some kid on UF gets $13M.

Twitter me

Well since .00000001% of high school grads play major college football on scholarship, there are millions of alternatives. And I don't know what profession or world you live in where all of the rules are the same? Do you have the same bonus package as your CEO? Same leave? Same expense account? In what world are player and coach the same job or skill set? They aren't- like you and the CFO of your company. You guys have the same exact compensation structure? nope. You can't have it both ways. You can't say - go get your money and in the next breath say its unethical that coaches can earn different compensation. That is not how it works in the real world.

The scenarios you mention aren't analogous to college sports. In a typical employer/employee relationship, the employer cannot prevent you from seeking additional income streams. I have a friend who was a VP at an agency, and he started a (paid) professional networking group that he runs on the side. I'm a Product Manager, and I do (or did before we had a kid) product manager interview coaching on the side. In a pre-NIL world, college athletes couldn't do this.

The reality is, there is no (legitimate) business in the world that is analogous to college sports (perhaps there's a reason for that). I can't think of any (again, legitimate) companies that generate tens (or hundreds) of millions dollars each year (like a Power 5 Athletic Department does), while (a) paying the majority of 'labor' in something other than cash and (b) preventing their labor from earning outside compensation.

Even if this argument does not sway you, I don't see a practical way to enforce amateurism or limits on NIL:

  • The NCAA doesn't have subpoena power, so to make a 'case', they are forced to whistleblowers and publicly available paper trails - which hasn't been effective for decades
  • Could they create a clearinghouse for all NIL deals? Only if they get an antitrust exemption (which seems unlikely due to (a) the current political climate, and (b) the NCAA history of failure in antitrust cases).

Even if the NCAA gets this antitrust exemption and they create this clearinghouse to somehow limit NIL, there's still an opportunity for boosters to compensate players under the table (like they have been for decades), and then the NCAA will find themselves in the same place they were in a pre-NIL world.

Not sure what you're looking for here... You can be angry man yelling at cloud as much as you want, but NIL is here to stay. 'Revenue' College Sports will continue to thrive (I think football in general will take a hit in the upcoming decades as more parents become cognizant of the health risks, and cfb interest will decline as a result, but that has nothing to do with NIL).

Twitter me

Yeah Im going to take exception to the over-simplification of your second sentence. My company and most major ones do in fact take exception to you earning outside income from ANYTHING remotely related to what you do for them or what they do. Could I open a weekend BBQ stand? perhaps. Could I do consulting work? nope. And I'll go back to something I asked long ago. Why are college athletes entitled to a situation "not analogous" to any other profession? They aren't - they sign on to the terms.

My company and most major ones do in fact take exception to you earning outside income from ANYTHING remotely related to what you do for them or what they do.

That's wild (and a very liberal use of 'remotely related' IMO) - I'll preface this by saying I've never worked related to the government, who I know is stingy about this - but I've never heard of this before. At my current job, they asked me to disclose any other employment I have, but as long as it's not competition, they don't care.

I have a lot of friends with side hustles that are tangentially related. I have another friend who's a supply chain software consulting but also runs an instagram page with 250k+ followers that makes up over a third of her take home. I got a friend who's also in product but has a real estate license, does 5ish deals per year. Can't imagine being in a situation where I'm not allowed to side hustle.

Why are college athletes entitled to a situation "not analogous" to any other profession? They aren't - they sign on to the terms.

In economic terms, the NCAA behaves like a cartel - you have a bunch of schools that have banded together and capped the money that their labor can make. No other legitimate business in America does this.

Twitter me

Google Non Disclosure Agreement

Hate to say it but there are a LOT of private sector jobs that not only require non-compete but No Moonlighting clauses in employment contracts. I would have to get an exception from my company if I even wanted to work on the weekends at a McDonalds. That has nothing to do with professional engineering.

Wild. I work in tech, as do most of my friends (except for one couple that are doctors) and I've never come across a 'no moonlighting' clause in 10 years at 4 companies.

Twitter me

I've worked for (what has become) one of the top 6 banks in the country and we have always been required to request permission from our immediate superior AND corporate HR before having ANY other employment-whether job with another company or a lawn business,etc.

That's separate and above limitations on even tangentially related jobs to main employment with my company(I.e. you can't be an appraiser on the side if you work in the mortgage side-even if you don't do any work for your employer).

And even serving on the board of a nonprofit requires notification and permission.

From the 2018 VT-uva game-"This is when LEGENDS are made!"

the employer cannot prevent you from seeking additional income streams.

They sure can. Employer can prevent any work that would interfere with current job, create competition, or otherwise harm the employer (especially harm to a company's image). Many states do have laws that limit what an employer can prevent.

🦃 🦃 🦃

In a typical employer/employee relationship, the employer cannot prevent you from seeking additional income streams.

Every company I've ever worked for has a clause in the contract that I cannot take a second job if it either creates a conflict of interest with my current job, is a competitor to my current employer, or creates an environment where my performance would be impacted by having that additional income stream.

This is my school
This is home

if it either creates a conflict of interest with my current job, is a competitor to my current employer, or creates an environment where my performance would be impacted by having that additional income stream.

But NIL deals don't do that. Side hustles (that I've mentioned above) don't do that.

Twitter me

Im simply pointing out that nope, major college football is not the only special labor agreement that has parameters on outside income, in fact most major US businesses do.

Your employer could argue that your side hustle could result in you not being well rested and focused on your job.

I thought of that as well, but 2 minutes of googling shows no precedent for that. Would be really hard for that to stand.

Twitter me

The reality is, there is no (legitimate) business in the world that is analogous to college sports (perhaps there's a reason for that). I can't think of any (again, legitimate) companies that generate tens (or hundreds) of millions dollars each year (like a Power 5 Athletic Department does), while (a) paying the majority of 'labor' in something other than cash and (b) preventing their labor from earning outside compensation.

Consider game shows:

I have characterized college football as American Idol before and wanted your thoughts on if that is at all applicable. CFP is a multiyear audition for the NFL. During your audition you get world class coaching, nutrition, strength & conditioning, and a stage to showcase your abilities. Oh and BTW an education should you choose to pursue it. In the end there are only a handful of participants who "win".
For American Idol, only the few last contestants will be able to monetize their appearance on the show. The rest of the participants don't get anything other than a fair shot at the prize. The TV network makes a ton of money off of the show. It isn't unfair that the participants don't get paid a portion of the tv revenue. I don't think this is unfair. I don't think the players are being exploited anymore than any game show contestant is exploited for the chance to win on Family Feud.

In the professional world coaches are closer to players than they are to CEOs. Head coaches are responsible for the coordinators, coordinators for assistants, but players aren't typically under the coaches. A software architect and software engineer are two different roles but they work together to create an end product. Same with Pro coaches and players. Top pro players make more than top coaches, the player minimum in nfl is above what most positions coaches make.

So the dichotomy is completely different from amateur sports to pro sports from how players are seen with in an organization.

College coaches are paid to win, not to prep players for professional football, or even prepare them to become a coach. So it's not really an internship for the players. And if coaches were there for the love of the game like many want the players, then the coaches would be volunteers or paid with scholarships. High school coaches weren't paid to coach, they were just teachers that volunteered, why is college different?

Now sure if you don't like any of that, the why do ncaa athletic scholarships have different rules than academic scholarships? If you have a full ride scholarships to VT for engineering you can still have a job, or sell feet pictures on your only fans. VT doesn't control your likeness. But if you play sports you have these weird rules that other students don't have. Can I gamble on March madness? Yup. Can I sell text books back that were bought through scholarships? Yup. Can I switch schools st any time because another offers me a scholarship? Yup. Why are student-athletes not able to do what ever other student can do?

It's a shitty choice that I had to make, do I give up a better shot at what would be my future, or do I try to compete for 4 more years. I wasn't good enough at swimming to get a chance at a major engineering school, so I stopped competing to work towards my profession. I don't like the idea that others have to make that choice. Why players get to be students that also get to fo something they love instead of having to be in some wierd state of giving away stuff just to play a sport.

The collective/boosters also backed out of the deal before he signed, so I don't think that's really the new benchmark, since it never actually got done.

I think your suggestion is misdirected.

Fairness is not an 18 year old able to make $13M. Fairness is giving an 18 year old an opportunity to make money. The fact some collective is willing to use that opportunity to give a recruit $13M isn't about fairness, but is about that collective throwing money away.

If there is a market to give an 18 year old stupid money, then that 18 year old should be able to benefit from it. I doubt this level of stupid money is sustainable. NIL isn't like an NFL salary in which there is a major return via ticket sales, merchandise, TV contracts, etc. I think when people realize that the return from NIL via a collective is essentially zero, the market will die down. But, I don't know, maybe people will continue to throw stupid money at collectives to hope their team wins one or two more games next year. We'll see.

🦃 🦃 🦃

I doubt this level of stupid money is sustainable. NIL isn't like an NFL salary in which there is a major return via ticket sales, merchandise, TV contracts, etc. I think when people realize that the return from NIL via a collective is essentially zero, the market will die down.

This is the question... I tend to agree with you, but I'm told there are a lot of soccer clubs owned by Saudi oil families that take a loss each year? Definitely going to be interesting to see how this goes over the next 5-10 years.

Twitter me

I don't know that it's not sustainable. I expect that to some degree it's a zero sum game and we'll just see a-lot of the $$ which previously went directly to university athletic foundations previously (and funded facilities, high coach and administrator salaries, etc because there was no other "legit" option) will instead now go to NIL collectives.

At least until the Universities manage to lobby the powers-that-be to put it back under their control...

Trust fund kids make 13 mil at 18. Which that's just being born into the right family, which often isn't different from athletes, I wasn't born into a family with genetics good enough to be a pro athlete

Why'd you getting downvoted...this is a fact and unfortunately the reality of college football now.

We're a fan site, fact have no place here /s

At the beginninging of the season, Triumph NIL (i think the more football-focused of Tech's NIL collectives) announced a deal with 28 players for 300,000 total. Details beyond that are sparse so idk how that was divided up, but that's a little over 10k a player based from that deal. The article also says more was coming but not sure if or how that came to fruition. Not nothing, but definitely not moving the needle big time

https://www.on3.com/nil/news/virginia-tech-hokies-college-football-trium...

Use on3.com as a reference with a large grain of salt. There are several instances where they have been less than accurate.

Yeah, I wasn't saying you were wrong but seeing on3 in any link automatically makes me suspicious of just what is incorrect. Just this week they released some big article that Florida's incoming big QB recruit Jaden Rashada was seeking a release from his letter of intent. A couple of hours later, his dad publicly said that was 100% false. So yeah... On3 isn't exactly a bastion of high quality journalism.

And yet... I know it doesn't mean on3 got it right, but it's possible someone close "understands" that he's done it and it just wasn't official yet?

"Why gobble gobble chumps asks such good questions, I will never know." - TheFifthFuller