M.J. Walker and the Ceiling For Buzzketball Recruiting

The Hokies lost out on a McDonald's All-American, but what did we learn from the process?

[Mark Umansky]

A few weeks ago in a gym in Jonesboro, Georgia, a McDonald's All-American decided where he'd play college basketball. A circumstance like that had not been relevant to the Virginia Tech men's basketball program for the last three decades. Yet on May 24, M.J. Walker propelled the Hokies into the national recruiting spotlight.

A sign with a maroon "VT" sat between logos for UCLA, Georgia Tech, Ohio State, and Florida State. Tech was among the finalists for one of the best remaining players in the country. Those interested in reading tea leaves were optimistic. The shooting guard took a late visit to Blacksburg, and the Hokies has recently announced the departure of Seth LeDay, theoretically freeing up a scholarship for a newcomer.

But alas, it was not to be. Walker chose Leonard Hamilton and Florida State, as the Hokies came up short in their quest for another highly touted talent. Before we go in on what this means for Buzz Williams and company, let's look at the process to get here.

Walker did what any smart second-tier prospect should do. He waited. Much to the chagrin of everyone courting him, Walker sat and weighed his options longer than almost any other top-100 recruit.

Though it frustrated onlookers, it was also shrewd. Player movement in college basketball extends well past national signing day in mid-May. The withdrawal deadline for underclassmen to remove themselves from the NBA Draft was May 24th, a week later than final day for high schoolers to sign a National Letter of Intent (May 17).

If you're a player who thinks you'll make it to the NBA, you want to go somewhere that'll give you playing time early. Why risk signing, only to have another pro prospect return to school? Walker has said on multiple occasions that he wants to play point guard, and after taking his visit to UCLA, Bruins playmaker Aaron Holiday announced his plan to return for his junior year in Los Angeles.

Had Walker committed to play out west, he would've either moved off-ball or been stuck behind Holiday on the bench, neither being an ideal situation for his freshman season. So he chose FSU, a team who lost its starting backcourt to the draft, and a coach in Hamilton who doesn't hesitate giving young guys big minutes.

As much as it hurts a Tech fan to admit, it seems like a solid decision on Walker's part. And while it's never ideal to miss out on a guy of that caliber, this process highlighted a few big-picture things when it comes to the Hokies and recruiting.

The Positives

Buzz and company came out of nowhere to become the rumoured leaders for Walker's services this spring. It was a surprise, primarily because Tech is in the exact opposite situation of the two schools described above. The backcourt in Blacksburg wasn't ravaged by departures, to the NBA or otherwise. In fact, it improved from a year ago.

Despite losing Seth Allen, the Hokies return Justin Robinson, Justin Bibbs, Devin Wilson, Ahmed Hill, Chris Clarke, and Ty Outlaw. If everything goes according to plan they'll also have Tyrie Jackson, who had eligibility issues and redshirted last season.

Williams and his staff also signed one of the best classes in program history, grabbing a pair of four-star guards in Nickeil Alexander-Walker and Wabissa Bede (as well as forward P.J. Horne). An M.J. Walker addition would have just been the cherry on an already delicious sundae.

And looking even further forward, Tech has a commitment from 6'3" shooting guard Jarren McAllister in 2018 and twin guards Kobe and Keyshaun Langley in 2019. Not only is the position stacked in 2017, it's lined with reinforcements for years to come.

Which makes Walker's consideration of the Hokies all the more interesting. Even with the self-confidence that comes along with a top prep ranking, why would he want to join an already crowded position group?

Much of it highlights Buzz's ability as a recruiter, and the way he can sell his vision to kids and parents alike. But there's also an interesting development taking place in the sport as a whole, something which benefits Williams.

Basketball has evolved over the last 10 years. In 2007 the San Antonio Spurs won the title with Tim Duncan playing next to a second center.

(Yes, I'm of the opinion that Duncan was a center, not a power forward, from the moment he got in the league. The dude guarded Shaq and played with his back to the basket. Just because he was drafted to the same team as David Robinson doesn't make him any less of a center. Sorry I'm so weirdly passionate about this.)

Just two years later, the Orlando Magic made the finals by surrounding Dwight Howard with four shooters. The Miami Heat unlocked their full potential by playing Chris Bosh as a "stretch five" (center who can shoot) and LeBron James at power forward.

Flash forward to 2017, and a new wave of coaches and talent evaluators have changed the way the league both drafts and plays. The sport is getting smaller, faster, and more skilled. In Boston, Brad Stevens is lauded for his lineup creativity, and often plays Avery Bradley, Marcus Smart, and Isaiah Thomas together. The weird thing about it? All three are 6'4" or shorter.

The NBA is no longer scared of guys they can't put a positional finger on, opening professional avenues to those who didn't necessarily have one before. The more a college coach is willing to use his players creatively — even if it means playing them "out of position" — the more they can succeed as both amateurs and professionals.

We all acknowledge that Buzz is weird., but some of his oddities are what makes him so interesting as a coach. Williams often experiments with his lineups, sometimes out of necessity, but also out of curiosity. Last year he routinely played two point guards at once, yet still ran offense through other playmakers.

Though Robinson and Allen were on the floor, Williams allowed Chris Clarke, Ahmed Hill, and even Zach LeDay to handle the ball. And if Walker had chosen the Hokies, you can bet that Buzz would've found a way to have him consistently involved too.

And throughout his career, Williams' best players have been ones without a pro position. Wesley Matthews wasn't explosive enough to play shooting guard, but not big enough to play small forward. He's in the middle of a 4 year, $70 million dollar contract with the Dallas Mavericks.

Jae Crowder fell out of the first round despite being the Big East Player of the Year in 2012. Why? He was a 6'6" power forward who did everything you'd want from someone 6'9" (sound familiar?). He's now a key member of the Celtics, cashing in one of the best contracts in the league.

And of course, Jimmy Butler nearly fell out of the first round because he wasn't athletic enough to be an explosive small forward. He made third team All-NBA, meaning he's considered one of the 15 best basketball players of 2017.

All three of those guys are huge selling points for Buzz, especially now with the open mindedness of scouts and general managers. They don't see prospects as "tweeners" but as versatile basketball players who can fill multiple roles. So if a coach like Williams can highlight your skills, regardless of your shape and size, there's a higher chance you won't be overlooked come draft time.

Though it seems like a fairly obvious point, finding those coaches is tougher than it may seem. In an era of one-and-done freshmen jumping to the pros, a school's brand often comes from its head coach. And those most entrenched are often ones unwilling to change their ways.

Mike Krzyzewski tried to get versatile, until his Duke team struggled with the ball in Grayson Allen's hands. Bill Self wanted a parade through the whole state of Kansas for playing small-ball last year. Roy Williams, Tom Izzo, and even the notoriously player friendly John Calipari are all stubborn enough to not embrace full on versatility year-to-year.

That's not even mentioning the system guys like Rick Pitino, Jim Boeheim, Shaka Smart, Tony Bennett, and the guy at Wisconsin who's not Bo Ryan (but is totally Bo Ryan). They're more famous for their style of play and steadfast defensive philosophies, and force incoming recruits to fit to them rather than vice versa.

When it comes to recruiting, it still behooves the top prospects to go to a Duke or Kentucky, rather than somewhere off the beaten path. When Ben Simmons missed the NCAA Tournament at LSU, people killed him. The way he was covered, you'd have thought he committed war crimes.

But Simmons was destined for the league, no matter where he signed out of high school. The next tier of talent is the one with a choice. Do guys like M.J. Walker hope to latch on with a premier program, where playing time and fit could come into question? Or do they pick somewhere less prestigious and hope they're put in a position to succeed early?

Take Simmons' class of 2015. P.J. Dozier, Carlton Bragg, Jawun Evans, and Deyonta Davis were all ranked in the same range that Walker was in 2017. Bragg and Davis opted for Kansas and Michigan State respectively. Bragg played two years in Lawrence before transferring to Arizona State. Davis turned pro last March, despite playing just 18 minutes a game for the Spartans. He was drafted 31st overall.

Dozier and Evans, however, decided to go elsewhere. The former picked South Carolina, and Frank Martin used him everywhere. Dozier often played point guard and became the type of multi-positional defender that interests scouts. He used the Gamecocks' run in the NCAA Tournament to turn pro, and looks like a high-second round pick. Evans chose Oklahoma State, and excelled under new coach Brad Underwood's lightning fast offense. The sophomore also declared for the draft, and looks like a late-first round pick.

It's a small sample, but it highlights the importance of the decision for guys like Walker. And more so, the opportunity coaches like Buzz have to bring in talent.

Yes, Walker spurned the Hokies. But the thinking behind why he'd consider coming to Tech in the first place makes for an optimistic look at the future. Williams and his staff won't get less creative, they'll evolve with the sport. And if they can continue to show their willingness to put their players in the best place to succeed both now and later, they're better positioned to land guys of this caliber.

The Negatives

The first point is obvious. Not only did Walker say no to Tech, but he linked up with an ACC opponent instead. Yes, Hokie fans are used to losing recruits to Florida State, but they're usually football players from Virginia Beach (sorry, had to). But the Noles' addition is more crucial now than in many other years.

Outside of the usual suspects (Duke, UNC, Louisville) the middle of the conference is wide open. Notre Dame returns Bonzie Colson, and Miami adds five-star guard Lonnie Walker, but the rest of the league faces questions.

Even with Walker, the Seminoles have to replace a lot. Syracuse struggled in '16-17 and lost Tyler Lydon and Andrew White III on top of it. UVA's at a bit of a crossroad, and only returns six scholarship players who've appeared in a college game. The Hokies could find themselves competing for the fourth or fifth seed should things break right, and losing a talented player to another team in the running for that territory is damaging in the short term.

But it's the bigger picture where this could pose a true concern.

Williams' goals for his time in Blacksburg have been clear from day one. Get good players, win more games. It's that simple. Yes, there are plenty of coaching clinics, family time, and motivational tweets to fill in the gaps, but he's never shied away from his devout desire to win.

He's also the only person to hold the program accountable. I met my dad for lunch the day after Walker's decision. Though we were both bummed, our general thinking was that Buzz was playing with house money. A trip to the NCAA Tournament combined with a great incoming class? Just three years removed from being the laughingstock of the ACC? We couldn't ask for much more.

But that's not the way Williams operates. He's not here for your March Madness participation trophies, nor for your reduced expectations. He doesn't want to use Tech's former listlessness as a crutch, nor as a way to keep their goals more attainable. He wants to win.

And the biggest obstacle between Virginia Tech and consistent trips to the dance is bringing players to Blacksburg. It was Williams' biggest challenge the moment he took the job, and it remains so today.

Outside of 2016 (where they were limited by scholarship numbers), the staff has drastically improved recruiting. According to 247Sports, they've had the fifth best class in the conference in 2014, 2015 and 2017. But nearly every big get has come with some sort of asterisk.

Hill followed Buzz from Marquette. Bibbs had already signed up to play for James Johnson, and stuck around. Clarke only committed after first picking Tennessee, and getting out of dodge before then-coach Donnie Tyndall was sanctioned by the NCAA. Tech got on Robinson early, but at the time of his commitment, he didn't have a ton of big offers.

This isn't trying to slander anyone on the roster. The Hokies look great now, and their future seems even greater. But if Buzz wants to keep improving to meet his goals, he'll need to land the next tier of prospects. Alexander-Walker is a great get, and Tech beat out a couple of big schools to get him (Maryland, USC, Baylor), but Walker is another class entirely.

Not only is he highly ranked, he was highly sought after. He had conversations with Kansas, took a visit to UCLA, and flirted with Thad Matta and Josh Pastner. Even if the youngster doesn't turn out to be as good as his rankings suggest — there's some concern about his physical dominance over other high school players that he won't have over college athletes — he's the type of signee that can change the perception of a program.

And no, Virginia Tech missing out on him isn't the end of the world for Buzzketball. But bringing in someone like Walker is the next step of the process. And if Buzz begins to consistently get close, but not land these guys, he could soon find a ceiling on his program that he can't do anything about.

Comments

let's just get this out of the way early:

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

Legitimately caused me to laugh out loud.

in related news, FSU yoinked a scholarship from the first player to commit to their 2017 class to make room for Walker. Sorry, bro. Best of luck.
Story Link

Warning: this post occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors)..

This is why i hate recruiting. Once a kid commits to you, you should have to honor that scholarship offer and not try to force him out or try to make him transfer. Mind you this issue is more noticeable in basketball because of the low number of scholarships but it also happens in football too.

Ask me no questions, and I'll tell you no lies

More than just a scholarship offer. The dude had already signed his NLI and everything. World class hose job, Noles.

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Wait, you can do that? You can pull a scholly after a NLI? That's binding on a player's side but not on the school's? Fuck that hard and fast.

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

and every school does it. our hands are not clean by any stretch of the imagination

Ask me no questions, and I'll tell you no lies

The way they frame it is that the player requested a release so he could transfer. That way, it's being initiated by the player rather than the school and that probably absolves FSU of any blame. I wanna see a player just refuse to play along one time and go public with it and see what happens. You'd think that the NCAA would keep them from pulling a scholarship from anyone who has signed an NLI, thus keeping FSU from landing Walker, but who knows?

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At that point, FSU would just pull the scholarship from an upperclassmen to make room.

yes, but what if no player was willing to go quietly? FSU would have to trump up some reason for kicking a kid off the team to be able to pull the scholarship, right?

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I've heard they have a problem with shoe theft.

Rip his freaking head off!

and crab legs...

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I see what you did there

King Alum of the House Hokie, the First of His Name, Khal of the Turkey Legs, The rightful Heir to the Big Board, the Unbanned, Breaker of Trolls and Father of Gritty

There should be a penalty for that or the player should be allowed to transfer no penalty to where ever he wants to go when that happens.

They released him from the NLI so he can go anywhere he wants with no restrictions and be eligible next year.

We learned once again that getting emotionally invested in recruiting for college athletics is bad for all of us and, more importantly, that shoe preference matters greatly

Oh and from this quote we learned that Brian is a cold-hearted man

Hokie fans are used to losing recruits to Florida State, but they're usually football players from Virginia Beach

Haters gonna hate, potatoes gonna potate, and hetzers gonna hetz

Great article Brian. I believe that Buzz's vision he sets for recruits combined with another year of more wins (sweet 16 here we come!) we will creep into Walker's class of recruits. Like Buzz has mentioned, he shies away from recruiting one and dones so that eliminates the top 15-20 players. That #20-75 range is where I think we can thrive on and hopefully he can convince a 6'7"-6'10" athletic forward or two to join us to compete with the ACC frontcourt giants and push us into that Elite 8, Final 4 range!

Its a good article, but I feel like it ended on an overly harsh note for what ended up being a Top 20 recruiting class, with the highest ranking of anyone who landed only 3. So Walker went to Florida State where it was a better fit for player and school than it would have been here or really anywhere else. We have to play against him every year, but you know what, so be it. I still LOVE the roster we have put together and we are going to be a downright dangerous team down the line. In fact, if losing out on Walker ends with being able to land Juwan Durham, I'll like our overall roster makeup slightly more than I would have liked seeing Walker here, because we need skilled size more than anything, and Walker doesn't exactly provide that.

This isn't trying to slander anyone on the roster. The Hokies look great now, and their future seems even greater. But if Buzz wants to keep improving to meet his goals, he'll need to land the next tier of prospects. Alexander-Walker is a great get, and Tech beat out a couple of big schools to get him (Maryland, USC, Baylor), but Walker is another class entirely.

And... I do take a little exception to this statement. NAW represents the best recruit we've gotten in a long while. Yes, he's not a part of the McD's A-A team, but very few are. ESPN still ranks him as the #20 recruit in the country, with 247 putting him at 34th. This is the exact kind of player we want, and its a little bit unfair to him and the team to now say his ability isn't good enough just because Walker chose FSU. If we didn't even get involved with MJW, we'd be crowing over this recruiting class because of the players we did pull in.

King Alum of the House Hokie, the First of His Name, Khal of the Turkey Legs, The rightful Heir to the Big Board, the Unbanned, Breaker of Trolls and Father of Gritty

I agree with everything you say in here, including coming across a little negative at the end, but when I read the article I took it to mean something a little different. I took it to mean that in order to get to the highest levels of recruiting, we need to be perceived as a place McD's A-As go to, and getting the first helps get us there, which we did not achieve.

Sometimes we live no particular way but our own

The fact that we were a finalist for a kid of that caliber while we're in a position where we're already pretty good at his position while there were schools out there trying to get him with a bigger pedigree with a bigger need for him speaks a TON about the recruiting abilities of Buzz Williams. I have no doubt that we are going to be pushing the envelope on what is truly possible with recruiting in the coming years with him leading the way, and should we get involved with a player of legitimate need that is receptive to what Buzz is selling, I have full faith we'll bring him in. And I can't wait for Whit to reveal his plans for Cassell's renovation, because the recruiting implications could be astronomical if we do it right.

King Alum of the House Hokie, the First of His Name, Khal of the Turkey Legs, The rightful Heir to the Big Board, the Unbanned, Breaker of Trolls and Father of Gritty

But we all know that there is quite the barrier to break to go from being a finalist to actually securing top guys. If we even got 20% of the top tier football recruits that seem to have us in their top 3 we would probably be in a different position right now. But that's just the economy of recruiting, only a few schools with secure those kinds of players. Just gotta keep trying and hope for a sprinkle of luck.

Yep. When it's your first couple "top 3's" you are just happy to be in the conversation. After a while, it definitely gets the feel of "always the bridesmaid, never the bride" and it just pisses you off. That said, we haven't gotten to that point in basketball yet like we have in football so why not enjoy it before the glow wears off?

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agree... NAW and MJW are basically the same level... They are way too close in the rankings/ratings for Walker to be "in another class entirely"

NAW..[ #34 on 247 composite... #7 SG 0.9863 rating] -- [ #35 on 247, #8 SG, 97 rating ]
MJW.. [ #26 on 247 composite.. #4 SG.. 0.9894 rating] -- [#33 on 247, #7 SG, 97 rating

so we're talking about two guys who are separated by 0.0031 points on 247's composite rating and are both fantastic guards. Looking at 247's in-house rankings they are basically the same player. #33 vs #35 overall, #7 vs #8 SG, both rated 97

Wasn't NAW not a McDonald's All-American because he's Canadian?

Outside it's night time, but inside it's LeDay

Not exactly how it works,

I'm sure there are more but these two came to mind

Touche.

Outside it's night time, but inside it's LeDay

I agree...no guarantee MJ Walker turns out better than NAW. NAW is a very highly rated player himself. Seems like be was slighted a little with that comment.

VHokie

FWIW VT basketball insider/basketball scout Rev Zeke Vodka (@KipTJam on Twitter) thinks Walker is a little overrated by the recruiting services and not quite the level that NAW is. Thinks he is still a very good prospect but closer to say an Ahmed Hill (50-65 range) than he is a NAW (20-35 range.)

Not trying to say that MJ won't be a one and done or a fantastic player for FSU. He probably will, but keep in mind that Rev sees these guys play in person as much if not more than those that rank these kids. Also, NAW probably would have had more offers if he didn't commit so early (that's really good for us though :)), he really blew up last summer after he committed.

In Sam Rogers we trust.

Can we appreciate how awesome Rev Zeke Vodka is as a name?

Outspoken team cake advocate. Hates terrapins. Resident Macho Man Gif Poster. Distant cousin to Dork Magic. Frequently misspells words.

Depends on how you want to rank kids. Walker is a bit more physically ready to contribute but is also close to being physically maxed out. NAW has a higher ceiling but might be a bit less likely to reach it. Don't think either is one and done. Think Walker could end up a 4 year guy at FSU, he's a bit of a man without a position at the NBA level unless he gets some more wiggle to play PG. He's not as fluid as NAW who I see as a 2 and through guy

This is an interesting analysis. A bit harsh, perhaps, but if we believe in the program we can take that.

We will need to start winning over these types of players, but we need a little bit of patience. VT has come pretty far, pretty fast. Buzz came to VT to prove something. Let's have faith that he'll get there.

I'm really looking forward to the next few seasons of VT basketball.

Looks like the MJ Walker miss for Ohio State was the last straw for Thad Matta being retained. Their AD announced today that he would not be back next season, citing late recruiting misses as the impetus on not seeing the needed improvements to the program to keep Matta employed.

https://sports.yahoo.com/news/thad-matta-part-ways-ohio-180559221.html

I can't believe Matta is only 50 years old. I would have assumed 70.

Wow, aOSU does have some unrealistic expectations.

This is significantly later than when we fired Greenberg. Is there even anyone worth a damn still available?

Unfortunately it will be some smaller school that has that up and coming coach that suffers the major brunt of this. OSU will have no problem finding someone to take the job.

I don't agree that this is the ceiling for Buzzketball recruiting. We missed one player, who at the end of the day wanted to play point guard and wasn't going to do that in Blacksburg. Two top 70 players and a three star sleeper that looks to be a Jae Crowder/Zach LeDay type PF.

Not to mention our 2018 commit is blowing up in the summer AAU circuit and our 2019 big is going to Oak Hill along with two other top 125 brothers that are moving up the rankings as well.

Buzz will not get one and dones but he will put Virginia Tech hokies into the NBA very very soon.

Always choose joy.

And no, Virginia Tech missing out on him isn't the end of the world for Buzzketball. But bringing in someone like Walker is the next step of the process. And if Buzz begins to consistently get close, but not land these guys, he could soon find a ceiling on his program that he can't do anything about.

I think everyone is projecting their own personal angst onto Brian's article. He said IF Buzz makes it a habit of coming close, but not finishing when recruiting the belle of the ball, then we'll hit a ceiling. As you said, this is a really good, maybe even a great class with reason for optimism in the next few classes as well. We still have an upward trajectory, but I agree with Brian. At some point, Buzz will need to not only get the interest of these types of players, but land them or we will start just holding our position in the conference instead of improving it.

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I think this is a headline vs article issue. His headline makes it seems as if the ceiling is in the recruitment. That last line makes it seem as if there is a ceiling to the program. The two don't go hand in hand. There is a very valid argument to be made that Bede for four years vs Walker for 1 or 2 and which will have a bigger impact on the program? I think people put way too much stock in 1 and dones as if they are needed to elevate you to the next level. What's the difference in a player like Walker vs NAW? Is the only difference that we have 1 of them now instead of 2?

To say if we continue to miss out on the 25th best player by ranking, but if we continue to get the 34th best player, is that really a difference? Is that really a ceiling on the program? I don't buy it, especially when I fully believe Horne is will be the best Hokie from this recruiting class and Buzz's best players have been some of his most under recruited.

Always choose joy.

And if Buzz begins to consistently get close, but not land these guys, he could soon find a ceiling on his program that he can't do anything about.

To be fair to the comment, I think there IS some angst in the article without a lot of projection. It's fair to take a position like that in an analysis, but it's there.

Given the strides this program has taken, it's a bit early to be putting a ceiling on it. The trajectory is still looking up.

Yes, 2019 class is turning in to a monster with the Langley's and BJ Mack.

'Its easy to grin, when your ship comes in, and you've got the stock market beat,
but the man worthwhile, is the man who can smile, when his shorts are too tight in the seat'

Well if Buzz leaves for Ohio State, then I'm totally blaming this article as the reason for his departure /s.

Blue chippers (Top 25) are definitely nice and welcomed, but if anyone has proven doing more with less, it's Buzz. Honestly, I don't think we're bringing in lesser talent as Buzz coaches these kids so much and squeezes every ounce of awesomeness out of them, that I think we'll be just fine. He's always talking about finding OKGs (Our Kind of Guys), that I don't think he'll be chasing all the top guys just to chase them. I'm just looking forward to watching his recent classes taking us back to the NCAA tournament and doing some damage!

The future is definitely bright.

Basketball has evolved over the last 10 years. In 2007 the San Antonio Spurs won the title with Tim Duncan playing next to a second center.

(Yes, I'm of the opinion that Duncan was a center, not a power forward, from the moment he got in the league. The dude guarded Shaq and played with his back to the basket. Just because he was drafted to the same team as David Robinson doesn't make him any less of a center. Sorry I'm so weirdly passionate about this.)

Aside from Buzz and the recruiticorn efforts of which we will reap infinite dividends, this Duncan is a center I AGREE WITH and passionate about 100% of the time!!!

Let's Go

HOKIES

(Yes, I'm of the opinion that Duncan was a center, not a power forward, from the moment he got in the league. The dude guarded Shaq and played with his back to the basket. Just because he was drafted to the same team as David Robinson doesn't make him any less of a center. Sorry I'm so weirdly passionate about this.)

http://www.cbssports.com/nba/news/watch-robert-horry-says-hakeem-olajuwon-was-20-times-better-than-tim-duncan/

Not agreeing, just messing with you.